Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Newer design of close-up computer monitors increases ease of use

30.08.2002


Eyeglasses with built-in computer monitors could soon be a reasonable alternative to reading text from a traditional computer screen, according to new research from Ohio State University.



Participants in a recent study rated the comfort and performance of these so-called near-eye displays as comparable to that of traditional computer monitors. Near-eye displays are like eyeglasses with a monitor built into the lenses.

"The problems with near-eye devices range from motion sickness to the device’s weight to poor image resolution," said James Sheedy, a study co-author and an associate professor of optometry at Ohio State University.


"But the design of such devices is improving, and the subjects in our study found the function and usefulness of the near-eye display similar to that of a regular computer screen."

The research appears in a recent issue of the journal Optometry and Vision Science. Sheedy, who is also the director of the computer vision clinic at Ohio State, conducted the study with Neil Bergstrom, the vice president of business development at Iridigm Display Corporation in San Francisco.

At the time of the study, Bergstrom was the chief technology officer of InViso Corporation, a now-defunct startup company specializing in microdisplays. InViso provided support for the study, and Sheedy served as a consultant to InViso during the study. InViso was acquired by the company Three-Five Systems, Inc. in spring 2002.

The researchers asked 22 subjects to participate in a reading experiment and a separate movement experiment.

The subjects used a total of five different displays to complete the tasks in the reading experiment: a hand-held monocular vision display with an attached cover for the non-viewing eye; a binocular vision display with a holder that wrapped around the subject’s head; hard copy with printed text; a flat panel computer screen; and a screen on a hand-held computer.

The participants were asked to perform four trials each of three different reading tasks: the first had subjects reading four separate paragraphs of about 325 words in length and answering three to four multiple choice questions at the end of each passage. The second task involved counting the occurrences of an assigned letter in a paragraph of nonsense words. In the final reading experiment, subjects were instructed to find three out of four occurrences of an assigned three-letter word on a spreadsheet filled with various three-letter words.

The researchers measured how long it took each subject to complete each reading task using the respective visual display. After using each type of display, the subjects were asked if they had experienced any of the following symptoms, and to what degree: headache, eyestrain, sore or irritated eyes, blurry vision, dizziness, nausea, disorientation, neck ache or backache.

Results showed that the performance of the monocular vision display was comparable to the performance of the flat panel screen and hard copy text.

"To our surprise, the reading tasks were completed faster with the monocular display than with the binocular display," said Sheedy. "This may have had to do with how each display fit the user, or the design of the respective device."

However, the subjects did complain about eyestrain more with the monocular display than with any of the other displays.

Performance speeds with the binocular display were about 5 to 7 percent slower than for the other displays, the researchers found. Sheedy suspects that this slower speed may have something to do with how the image is aligned along the line of sight in each lens.

The image displayed by a near-eye device may appear to be much farther - up to 6 feet away - from the viewer than an image on a typical computer monitor. The seemingly greater distance makes for easier viewing, Sheedy said. But the image size in a near-eye display is about the size of an average computer screen.

"Traditional displays are constrained by their physical size and are usually about 20 to 30 inches from the eyes," he said.

The second experiment assessed the risk for motion-related symptoms while wearing the binocular head display.

Seated subjects were asked to rotate their heads several times to the left and right, and again up and down. They performed the same task while standing. They were also asked to rotate their head while sitting and while standing.

"Motion-related symptoms were a large problem in previous studies," Sheedy said. "Participants didn’t have much problem with motion sickness in this study, probably due in part to the nature of the tasks they were asked to perform.

"Most of the previous studies on near-eye displays used video movement or virtual reality tasks that created movement on the virtual display. These kinds of tasks are more likely to cause queasiness."

Nor were the participants in the current study fully immersed in the image. That is, neither the monocular nor binocular displays blocked the user’s peripheral vision, so he could focus on the image in front of him and still see his surroundings.

"Being able to see the real environment while wearing a display gives the user a visual reference that can help lessen confusion when the eye sees the image move," Sheedy said. "For most of the common uses, the user wouldn’t want to be fully immersed in the virtual environment."

Although several prototypes exist, near-eye displays have yet to become common. It’s only a matter of time before they do, Sheedy said. He doesn’t see such devices becoming a commodity in the office, but he does predict that they’ll find a place in business and industry.

"From a remote location, a warehouse worker stocking orders can use a wearable display to look up accounts," he said. "A traveling salesperson can pull up email messages, addresses and other vital information en route to his destination."

A user can plug his display into a hand-held computer and see a full-size page, or surf the web from his cell phone and see the entire site, rather than a fraction of the information.

"These portable displays give a viewer complete privacy when viewing a document," Sheedy said. "That goes for confidential documents, email, web pages and so on."


Contact: James Sheedy, 614-247 7632; Sheedy.2@osu.edu
Written by Holly Wagner, 614-292-8310; Wagner.235@osu.edu

James Sheedy | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.acs.ohio-state.edu/units/research/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Five developments for improved data exploitation
19.04.2017 | Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz GmbH, DFKI

nachricht Smart Manual Workstations Deliver More Flexible Production
04.04.2017 | Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz GmbH, DFKI

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA's Fermi catches gamma-ray flashes from tropical storms

25.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers invent process to make sustainable rubber, plastics

25.04.2017 | Materials Sciences

Transfecting cells gently – the LZH presents a GNOME prototype at the Labvolution 2017

25.04.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>