Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Messaging without barriers

29.05.2008
The trouble with current messaging services is that many of them can’t talk to each other. Heterogeneous networks, proprietary messaging services or competing standards and incompatible user devices get in the way of simple, seamless communication.

Now, however, European researchers from the COMET (COnverged MEssaging Technology) project say help is on the way. The researchers aimed at developing and implementing a messaging architecture and framework to let users send, receive, navigate and manage their messages irrespective of network technology and access device, at any time and wherever they are.

A key element of the COMET architecture is the Message Routing Protocol, which allows single messages as well as instant message dialogues to be exchanged between distinct and previously incompatible message domains, including SMS, MMS, IM, voicemail and videomail.

The researchers have also spearheaded new standards aimed at unifying the messaging world.

“The exchange of messages across messaging domains up to now is non-existent or not reliable at best,” says John van Kemenade, COMET’s Project Manager. “From an end-user perspective COMET allows a messaging user to send and receive messages without having to know what messaging technology his or her counterpart is using. The user simply can focus on the message itself.”

COMET may soon make sending and receiving a message as easy as having a telephone conversation.

“It demonstrates that a truly ubiquitous messaging experience, comparable to the global voice telephone service, is possible”, Kemenade says.

Expanding the electronic community

Users, from text-messaging students to busy executives using a panoply of services such as instant messaging, voicemail, voice-over-internet, videomail, text and multimedia, will not be the only beneficiaries of the new technology.

COMET’s researchers hope that a more consistent and intuitive messaging service will allow new groups – for instance senior citizens or other groups that are less technology-savvy – to join the ‘electronic messaging community’.

Operators and service providers can continue to offer their current internet, text, or multimedia messaging services, since the COMET technology integrates rather than replaces them. In addition, uniform standards and coordination across message domains will speed up the development of new products and accelerate the uptake of new messaging services.

“COMET technology protects existing messaging infrastructure investments while on the other hand it enables the operator to create new revenues.” says Kemenade.

COMET’s message convergence approach is based on seamless and presence-aware message inter-workings between the legacy message domains, he points out. That is, the system is aware when and where recipients are reachable, and by what kind of message service. Beyond that, the messaging experience is improved with user preferences.

“For example,” says Kemenade, “we can have rules that I don’t want any messages on Sunday except from my boss, and only on my phone. But not if it’s a video message that runs for half an hour because my battery won’t last that long.”

Free open-source software

Establishing the reliability of the new messaging framework under real-world conditions was vital. Consortium partners developed a laboratory to test a wide range of messaging scenarios, devices and access networks. They also released Seagull, a free, open-source traffic generator and suite of tools for testing the kinds of protocols developed or inspired by COMET.

The consortium has also created a messaging pilot centre in Grenoble, France, where researchers can demonstrate COMET-inspired messaging services. Developers of next-generation products can use the centre to test a concept or solution, and integrate new products into existing IP networks.

The consortium also focused on the user’s experience. For this, they created a highly intuitive messaging user experience model and client software that can run on desktop computers, handsets, set-top boxes and a variety of other devices. The software can manage all messaging with a consistent look and feel.

“You have one user experience that looks the same and feels the same across all kinds of devices, and is also capable of handling all kinds of messages,” says Kemenade.

The consortium also performs fundamental research related to messaging quality control. Kemenade lauds the researchers for breakthrough findings on how to sustain user experience when multimedia messages are sent across public and open-access networks without overloading them with traffic.

The consortium wants to contribute to a unified set of standards to enable seamless, global, messaging. To accomplish this, they work closely with several international industry bodies, including the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), and especially the Open Mobile Alliance (OMA), created in 2002 specifically to deal with the proliferation of mobile applications and standards.

COMET also participates in a series of industry plugfests, which are workshops where companies link up and try out new telecommunications products. The consortium will report about their most recent accomplishments at the ICT Mobile Summit 2008, 10-12 June, in Stockholm, Sweden. Their finalised converged messaging service framework will appear as COMET Release 4, expected by October 2008.

The partners in the consortium include Acision, a Netherlands-based company delivering messaging infrastructures to operators and service providers and Colibria, a Norwegian company specialising in mobile instant messaging and presence systems.

SQS is a Spanish company delivering compliancy and validation services for converged messaging products and services’. HP’s OpenCall unit in France, where products and solutions for the IMS world are initiated, is another participant along with the Technical University Eindhoven, which is known for technological research in communication technology as well as modelling skills and capabilities. Movial is based in Finland and offers client software and services for the converged multimedia and presence-enabled application market.

The COMET project is due to end in October 2008 and is funded under the EU's Sixth Framework Programme for research.

Ahmed ElAmin | alfa
Further information:
http://cordis.europa.eu/ictresults/index.cfm/section/news/tpl/article/id/89762

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Stable magnetic bit of three atoms
21.09.2017 | Sonderforschungsbereich 668

nachricht Drones can almost see in the dark
20.09.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>