Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Leicester takes radical look at educational value of virtual 3D learning

14.12.2007
A new experimental research island has been established by the University of Leicester in a pioneering project that aims to identify the educational benefits of Virtual Worlds.

Researchers want to take a radical look at how learning and teaching in 3D worlds can be best achieved. The Virtual Island will be launched by the University of Leicester on 18 December.

Leicester, one of Britain’s biggest postgraduate distance-learning providers, plans to start with a ‘blank canvas’ upon which a picture can be painted on what works- and what doesn’t – in cyber learning. This could provide a template for educational establishments across the UK and beyond.

The Leicester research project is using the Second Life Virtual World and will examine

What can universities achieve to enhance learning in Second Life that they cannot do on Real Life campuses?

How do learners benefit?

What do educational resources look and feel like in Second Life?

Which disciplines and topics benefit the most?

How do avatars learn?

How do avatars teach?

Could the establishment of Virtual Worlds just be a phase or a gimmick?

Is it divisive to have virtual worlds for educational purposes?

The Beyond Distance Research Alliance team at the University of Leicester say the explosion of interest in Virtual World learning is akin to the impact of the Internet some 15 years ago – and it is therefore critical for institutions to create platforms that are fit for educational purposes, rather than simply placing ‘content’ on for its own sake.

Professor of eLearning and Learning Technologies at the University of Leicester, Gilly Salmon, says:

“We have created an Island in Second Life for communities of learners, teachers, technologists and creative practitioners to explore the educational benefits of 3D worlds. At a time when the ‘buzzword’ is student experience…we must push out the boundaries.

For the first time in the history of higher education, the digital world has offered us a low cost 3D environment for exploration and construction. No-one yet knows whether it’s ‘worth it’ and the nature of the value it will add to learning. But it’s up to us- the educators of the 21st Century- to find out.

"Our Second Life Island is a pleasant and creative environment set up for the groups of learners, researchers and teachers to collaborate and explore. We plan to build on the very best of what we already know about using online environments for teaching and learning and find out the benefits of the new characteristics and opportunities.”

The Leicester Island, created in collaboration with TwoFour Learning, a media and learning company based in Plymouth, is unlike any other in the virtual world. Professor Salmon says:

“The Media Zoo is not a direct replication of physical environments found in real life -instead Leicester took the opportunity to develop something a little more radical.

Leicester’s Island has gone beyond general information and documents. Many Second Life Islands are currently going through the same processes and periods the Internet did with content being uploaded for the sake of content, the Leicester Island to drawing in the latest technologies available in Second Life to add value to the visitors (e.g. RSS Feeds and a Virtual Reality Theatre)

Thinking beyond the psychological and communicative benefits of Island provision, we have to think about we can do in Second Life which we cannot easily do in real life; in which case simulations of events, actions and practices could prove to be the most educational benefit.

We plan that all disciplines will see a benefit, but from initial interest and ideas Second Life will certainly have a large impact on the sciences and all on disciplines with collaborative elements in their teaching. With a huge potential for simulation and experimentation taking student part into scenarios where they previously learnt from conceptual ideas.

For learning communities the environment presents new opportunities, for example in the case of distance learners, Second Life gives them an environment in which they can meet and discuss synchronously whilst giving an identity to the cohort through their avatars.

Our research project is trying to identify preferred and viable futures for formal education and how 3D virtual worlds could enhance the learner experience. The Island allows us to immerse ourselves in a potential environment that could form all or part of that future. The pedagogies and models developed through the research project will be transferable to future 3D environments.”

Richard Wallis, Head of TwoFour Learning, adds: “Second Life presents us with an amazing opportunity to think in entirely new ways about teaching and learning. Whether it's extending the classroom experience, learning through simulation, or exploring new forms of collaborative working, the possibilities are endless, and present major challenges to educators.”

Ather Mirza | alfa
Further information:
http://www.le.ac.uk/seal
http://www.le.ac.uk/press/experts/intro.html

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Cutting edge research for the industries of tomorrow – DFKI and NICT expand cooperation
21.03.2017 | Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz GmbH, DFKI

nachricht Molecular motor-powered biocomputers
20.03.2017 | Technische Universität Dresden

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>