Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Real and artificially generated 3-D films are nearly impossible to distinguish

02.08.2016

3-D technology is particularly interesting for action and horror films, less for documentaries

For viewers it seems to be very difficult to tell the difference between real and artificially rendered 3-D films. Psychologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have studied the effects of various technologies and found that it plays virtually no role in the viewer’s experience whether a 3-D film was originally produced as such or whether it was later converted from 2-D to 3-D using algorithms as, for example, is the case with new 3-D televisions.


Test subject watching a 3-D film

photo/©: Andreas Baranowski, JGU

"That is surprising when you consider how much time and money goes into producing real 3-D films," said Andreas Baranowski of the Institute of Psychology at Mainz University. In the study, test subjects were shown six short film sequences, two each from the categories horror, action, and documentary films. While there were no detectable differences when it came to the two 3-D technologies, there was divergence in the way that the three individual categories were assessed.

The 108 subjects of the study were given 3-D glasses and had to rate the impressions made on them by the film segments. For example, they had to say whether the story in the film drew them in, whether they were impressed by the technological aspects of the film, what type of emotion or excitement they experienced, and whether they felt any sort of queasiness due to the camera movements. They were also asked what they thought of the main characters in the films.

According to the results, 3-D films essentially inspire stronger feelings of being drawn into the story than 2-D films. However, 3-D films also more often cause slight nausea because of what can be described as 'motion sickness'. When it came to the film categories, the researchers in Professor Heiko Hecht’s work group identified stronger effects. Due to the 3-D technology, subjects felt more drawn into the action and horror films, but were less emotionally attached to the main characters in the documentary films than when they watched them in 2-D.

It was of virtually no significance whether the 3-D aspect of the film was real or an algorithmic conversion. This contradicts the common assumption that the stereo disparity of the eyes, i.e. the difference between the two eyes' angles of view of a given object, needs to be accurately reproduced.

"In fact, our visual system seems to be surprisingly tolerant when what it has to do is combine information from the left and right eyes into one stereoscopic image," explained Baranowski, primary author of the study. However, he also pointed out that during the study the films using the different 3-D technologies were shown one after the other and that any differences might have been more noticeable if they had been viewed in parallel.

Publication:
Andreas M. Baranowski, Kristina Keller, Julia Neumann, Heiko Hecht
Genre-dependent effects of 3D film on presence, motion sickness, and protagonist perception
Displays 44, 53-59, 1 July 2016
DOI: 10.1016/j.displa.2016.06.004

Photo:
http://www.uni-mainz.de/bilder_presse/02_psychologie_3d_filme_01.jpg
Test subject watching a 3-D film
photo/©: Andreas Baranowski, JGU

Contact and further information:
Dipl.-Psych. Andreas Baranowski
General Experimental Psychology
Institute of Psychology
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
55099 Mainz, GERMANY
phone +49 6131 39-39278
fax +49 6131 39-39268
e-mail: baranowski@uni-mainz.de
https://www.blogs.uni-mainz.de/fb02-aep/baranowski-andreas/

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141938215300214 – Article in Displays

Petra Giegerich | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Football through the eyes of a computer
14.06.2018 | Universität Konstanz

nachricht People recall information better through virtual reality, says new UMD study
14.06.2018 | University of Maryland

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

Im Focus: Photoexcited graphene puzzle solved

A boost for graphene-based light detectors

Light detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as smartphone cameras. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computing

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries

19.06.2018 | Life Sciences

New material for splitting water

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>