Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The Present and Future of 3D

25.01.2011
Takashi Kawai, a Professor at the Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, analyses the current boom in 3D entertainment and the potential future applications of 3D technology.

The Beginning of the 3D Era and the Boom Phenomenon

2010 has been called the beginning of the 3D era, a year in which the term 3D frequently appeared in the media. Here, I use 3D to mean three-dimensional images, or to give them their proper name, stereoscopic images, reproduced to appear in front of or behind the screen. The word stereoscopic was coined by the inventor of the stereoscope, Sir Charles Wheatstone, who first used the term in a paper published in 1838. It derives from the Greek words stereos, meaning solid, and scope, meaning viewing instrument.

The phenomenon of periodic booms in 3D is often pointed out. These were mainly 3D movie booms that occurred in the 1950s and 1980s, and the present day is sometimes referred to as the third boom. The fact that 3D has until now never developed beyond a temporary fad is an indication of the difficulty in popularizing it. Nevertheless, the repeated appearance of such booms does suggest that 3D is a kind of dream technology for human beings. Here I would like to mention the characteristic ripple effect of present day 3D. The rapid development outside the film industry of 3D-compatible TVs, game consoles and mobile devices currently being announced and released by various manufacturers has exceeded the expectations of most researchers such as myself, as well as industry related people.

Issues of Present Day 3D

Although the spread of 3D is expected to result in the creation of new industries and culture, it is still uncertain what the merits and added value will be for users. When asked, “What is the advantage of 3D movies or TV?” it is not enough to simply answer that “things leap out of or into the screen”. Scientific verification of whether 3D can really convey different sensations than 2D, or of what elements of 3D people find appealing, is urgently required so that the current boom does not turn into just another temporary fad.

At our laboratory, we have been conducting an experimental study of current 3D issues as they relate to the user experience. From Figure 1 we can see that the line of sight is concentrated mostly on people, and especially faces, when watching a movie in 2D. Figure 2 is the result when viewing the same movie in 3D. Here we see that the line of sight is concentrated not only on people’s faces but also on the objects in the foreground. To clarify the cause of such a distinctive difference, we have performed a range of detailed analyses, especially of the link with the spatial construction of visual data.

Initiatives toward the Future of 3D

While tackling the present day tasks of explaining viewer recognition and emotional aspects, our laboratory is also facing the challenge of looking to the future of 3D. One such direction is new applications of 3D. An example of this is three-dimensional character blocks for literacy learning developed through joint research with the Division of Developmental Neuropsychology at the National Center for Child Health and Development. The intention is to utilize spatial reasoning capacity in literacy learning by adding information of depth according to the stroke order of a character to its ordinary two-dimensional shape. Such a conceptual shift from representing real shapes three-dimensionally to envisioning a specific effect and venturing to express it three-dimensionally could produce an unprecedented demand for 3D.

Another direction we have taken relates to the extension towards perceptual experience through 3D representation other than vision. Figure 3 shows an example of this, a tactile behavioral illusion system. By combining 3D and tactile stimulation based on certain measurements, this system enables people to experience sensations that have not actually been triggered. Specifically, we can create an illusion related to bodily sensation, a feeling that a stationary object touching one’s hand is moving across the surface of that hand. Such a shift in awareness from a single sense to the integration of multiple senses, or in other words, from vision to brain function, could be vital in shaping the 3D-based media of the next generation.

The desire to see remote things or to present them so that they can be seen is a fundamental trait in human beings. That is to say, interest in and expectations for 3D are perfectly natural, and so the future of 3D also seems linked, to some extent, to human potential.

About the author:

Takashi Kawai, Professor, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University

Graduated in 1993 from the Department of Human Health Sciences, School of Human Sciences, Waseda University. Having completed a doctoral course at Waseda University’s Graduate School of Human Sciences in 1998, he went on to hold several positions at the University, including Research Associate at the School of Human Sciences, Full-time Lecturer at the Global Information and Telecommunication Institute (GITI), and Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Global Information and Telecommunication Studies (GITS). Since 2008 he has held the concurrent positions at Waseda University of Professor at GITS and Professor in the Department of Intermedia Art and Science at the School of Fundamental Sciences and Engineering. Dr. Kawai has a doctorate in Human Sciences. His primary works include Fundamentals of 3D Image Expression [3D Rittai eizou hyougen no kiso]

waseda university | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/adv/wol/dy/opinion/science_110124.htm
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Smart Computers
18.08.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

nachricht AI implications: Engineer's model lays groundwork for machine-learning device
18.08.2017 | Washington University in St. Louis

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>