Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Optical firewall aims to clear internet security bottlenecks

31.10.2008
European researchers are developing the world’s first optical firewall capable of analysing data on fibre optic networks at speeds of 40 gigabits per second. Their work promises to save the internet from the looming threat of network security bottlenecks.

As demand for data-intensive services, such as video-on-demand and online gaming increases, telecommunications providers are expanding the high-speed fibre optic networks that form the backbone of the internet. But while network performance has improved, the electronic processes and algorithms used to filter data for security threats are struggling to keep pace.

With demand for data-intensive services only likely to intensify further in the future, bottlenecks seem inevitable unless security processes can be implemented at optical network speeds.

“The amount of data being transmitted can and will get much higher as data-intensive services become more commonplace,” says Graeme Maxwell, the vice-president for Integration Technologies at CIP Technologies in the UK.

“Even with mobile phones, the data sent over 3G networks ends up on a fibre optic cable very quickly, in as little as two or three hops... It’s the data analogy of many little streams quickly feeding into a river and causing a massive flood.”

Add to the growth of wireless communications the expansion of fixed-line and cable broadband services in homes and offices, and, according to some estimates, traditional electronic security processes will soon be unable to cope.

“There is a real need for an optical security solution – and that is what we are developing,” Maxwell says.

Working in the EU-funded WISDOM project, Maxwell leads a team of researchers who have demonstrated novel optical circuits capable of searching for and identifying target data patterns at wire speeds of 40Gb/s – the fastest data rate of current commercial networks. Using custom algorithms, their groundbreaking optical firewall looks for patterns in the header content of data packets (the part of the data containing information about the sender, recipient and format) to single out possible viruses, attacks or other threats.

“Our goal is not to replace electronics with optics but to complement existing security processes,” Maxwell notes.

Filtering threats optically

The WISDOM firewall acts as a kind of primary, high-speed filter that routes suspect packets to electronic processes for further analysis. It is able to carry out optical packet recognition, interrogation and manipulation of data streams incorporating features of parity checking, flag status, and header recognition. And, because there is no optical equivalent of electronic memory, the entire process has to be carried out on the fly.

Described as an “optical firewall on a chip”, the system is built on a state-of-the-art hybrid integrated photonic technology platform developed by CIP in which silica-on-silicon circuits form an optical equivalent of an electronic printed circuit board (PCB). Much like a PCB can host different electronic components depending on its intended use, different optical and optoelectronic components can be fitted to the optical circuit board, resulting in a cost-effective and scalable solution.

The hybrid boards can also be fitted with components fit for other uses, with the WISDOM project partners foreseeing applications in sensor systems, avionics, data transmission and optical processing, as well as network security.

“Think about all the applications for today’s electronic PCBs – they are everywhere! Optical boards could have a similar range of uses in the future,” the project coordinator says.

Indeed, Maxwell expects the first commercial application of the boards to be for data transmission over fibre optic networks, with their implementation for network security likely to follow within the next five years.

“The WISDOM project is demonstrating the functionality of an optical firewall, hopefully to the point where we can bring additional manufacturers onboard in a follow-up project,” Maxwell says.

He admits that the idea of an optical firewall is still a new concept to many in the network security sector.

“There are barriers to its acceptance that need to be overcome,” he notes.

However, having survived the bursting of the dot.com bubble eight years ago that led many research groups trying to develop optical security solutions to disband, the research team, which launched the WISDOM project in 2006 with funding from the EU’s Sixth Framework Programme, are well placed to rise to the challenge.

And, with the recent boom in data-intensive services, their solution is likely to be in high demand.

Christian Nielsen | alfa
Further information:
http://cordis.europa.eu/ictresults
http://cordis.europa.eu/ictresults/index.cfm/section/news/tpl/article/BrowsingType/Features/ID/90127

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Cutting edge research for the industries of tomorrow – DFKI and NICT expand cooperation
21.03.2017 | Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz GmbH, DFKI

nachricht Molecular motor-powered biocomputers
20.03.2017 | Technische Universität Dresden

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating stars

22.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>