Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mathematics for safer medicine

07.01.2014
The new HITS research group “Data Mining and Uncertainty Quantification” analyzes large amounts of data and calculates uncertainties in technical systems.

With Prof. Vincent Heuveline as their group leader, the group of mathematicians and computer scientists especially focuses on increasing the security of technology in operating rooms.


Prof. Dr. Vincent Heuveline, group leader, „Data Mining and Uncertainty Quantification group” at HITS

The new HITS research group “Data Mining and Uncertainty Quantification” analyzes large amounts of data and calculates uncertainties in technical systems. With Prof. Vincent Heuveline as their group leader, the group of mathematicians and computer scientists especially focuses on increasing the security of technology in operating rooms.

Natural Sciences continuously produce larger and more complex data sets – using elaborate sensor technology or computer simulations. But can researchers be sure that the results of their computer simulations are reliable and accurate enough even if some aspects of the system under consideration are not exactly known? The new research group “Data Mining and Uncertainty Quantification” at the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) wants to shed light on this question. With Prof. Vincent Heuveline as group leader, six researchers focus on the analysis of large data sets and on the calculation of uncertainties within technical systems. They use state-of-the-art technology from the areas of High Performance Computing and Cloud Computing.

“Today’s computing power allows us to analyze and determine the quality of a calculation, by including a characterization of uncertainty“, says group leader Vincent Heuveline who is a professor at Heidelberg University. “We can therefore develop new scientific methods which add a new twist to the old philosophical question: ‘What is certain?’.”

The research group has chosen operating rooms as a key application area. “Nowadays, operating rooms are as well-equipped as a cockpit with its numerous technical instruments,” Heuveline explains. The instruments continuously generate a large amount of data so that the surgeon knows about the patient’s condition and the status of the devices. “Surgeons must be able to fully rely on their instruments, just like pilots”, Heuveline says. “We want to make sure they can do so.” The HITS researchers analyze the technical systems, simulate surgical procedures including their impact on the body of the patient, and also calculate the probability of an error occurring during the simulations. “The results of our observations will be integrated into the IT infrastructure of the operating room and make the systems even more reliable.”

The research group maintains a close relationship with the University of Heidelberg, which is illustrated by the overall organization. Besides his professorship, Vincent Heuveline also works as director of the university’s computer center, where he and 85 employees are responsible for the IT infrastructure of Germany’s oldest university, from e-mail accounts to high-performance computers. He also heads a research group at the university, the “Engineering Mathematics and Computing Lab” (EMCL) at the Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing.

Vincent Heuveline (born in 1968) studied Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science at the Universities of Caen (France) and Würzburg. He received his PhD in Computer Science in 1997 from the Université de Rennes and habilitated in Mathematics at the University of Heidelberg in 2002. Since 2004, he was a professor at Karlsruhe University (KIT) until he moved to Heidelberg in May 2013.

Press Contact:
Dr. Peter Saueressig
Public Relations
Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS)
Phone: +49-6221-533245
Peter.saueressig@h-its.org
www.h-its.org
Twitter: @HITStudies
Scientific Contact:
Prof. Dr. Vincent Heuveline
Group leader
Data Mining and Uncertainty Quantification
Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS)
Phone: +49-6221-533312
vincent.heuveline@h-its.org

Dr. Peter Saueressig | idw
Further information:
http://www.h-its.org
http://www.h-its.org/english/press/pressreleases.php?we_objectID=1051

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht World first demo of labyrinth magnetic-domain-optical Q-switched laser
28.07.2016 | Toyohashi University of Technology

nachricht New movie screen allows for glasses-free 3-D
26.07.2016 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology, CSAIL

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2016: 7th Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

29.07.2016 | Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Vortex laser offers hope for Moore's Law

29.07.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Novel 'repair system' discovered in algae may yield new tools for biotechnology

29.07.2016 | Life Sciences

Clash of Realities 2016: 7th Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

29.07.2016 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>