Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Health e-Grids

14.04.2010
Cancer, heart and circulatory system diseases cause two thirds of all deaths in Europe. Three research projects at this week’s Enabling Grids for E-sciencE (EGEE) User Forum in Uppsala, Sweden, are demonstrating ways that modern computing techniques can investigate today’s biggest killers.

As it becomes increasingly sophisticated, the field of medicine is grappling with unprecedented data demands. EGEE, providers of the world's largest multi-disciplinary computing grid, help scientists from all fields manage their work quickly and efficiently, with medical researchers and doctors increasingly joining their ranks.

Grid computing can connect doctors and researchers to both computing power and remote databases of medical information. It has the added benefit of an inbuilt secured system preventing unauthorised access to any sensitive patient information.

The HeMoLab project is interested in the heart as well as the system that it is connected to. They are working on developing models, techniques and tools for simulating the entire cardiovascular system. The first accurate description of how the heart pumps blood around the body was published by Arabic physician Ibn al-Nafis in 1242. Since then our knowledge of the way our heart works has expanded to fill volumes. The main motivation for this project is the deeper understanding about the complex physiological interactions in the human body and their role in the onset and progress of several cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, with this study it is also possible to provide relevant information so as to use it as complementary data for medical training, diagnosis and eventually surgical planning.

The simulation of a single heart beat can take up to 20 days in a single computer depending on the degree of approximation considered for problem. Using the grid computing infrastructure offered by the EELA-2 project it is now possible to perform the execution of multiple simulations at the same time. Paulo Ziemer from the HeMoLab team worked on getting the application up and running on the grid. “Porting the application was a great experience, that certainly helped us a lot to understand how grid computing could help the simulation of models that demand high computing power. Further tests need to be made yet, but I think the first step was accomplished successfully.”

In Europe cancer is responsible for 1 in 4 deaths and is the single greatest killer of people aged 45-64[1]. Again early diagnosis is the best way of helping people with the disease. However doctors frequently face problems in accessing the abundance of data that is constantly generated by labs, hospitals, doctors and health authorities.

Another project, Sentinel, centred in France, brings together many areas of cancer research: screening structures, medical laboratories and both regional and national public health authorities. It aims to enable secured medical data exchanges between cancer screening organisations and cancer analysis laboratories. Grid technology – which easily connects data sources and provides a secure framework – is particularly well suited for this situation, where patient data must only be available to authenticated and authorised users.

Starting in 2009, Sentinel’s first objective was to offer access to electronic pathology reports for cancer screening. Since then, Sentinel has been expanded to allow the French national health organisation access to the medical data in order to produce statistics on cancer within the Auvergne region. Recently the team has added a module to allow health professionals to use their smartcards to gain access to the data and are hoping to expand the system nationwide.

Improving the speed of diagnosis and finding areas to focus on in order to treat an illness is essential in tackling cancer and heart disease. All of these projects demonstrate where medical research is going in their use of computers. EGEE has worked for the last 6 years to provide the tools to create a platform for the medical profession and Sentinel, HeMoLab and Gwendia have proven not only its usefulness but also its flexibility.

Catherine Gater | CERN
Further information:
http://www.egee-eu.org
http://www.epha.org/a/2352

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht New technology enables 5-D imaging in live animals, humans
16.01.2017 | University of Southern California

nachricht Fraunhofer FIT announces CloudTeams collaborative software development platform – join it for free
10.01.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

Im Focus: Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugar

Many pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now, in cooperation with researchers at the University of York in the United Kingdom, analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that could make the protein poorer at grabbing and holding and hence compromise the pathogen in the host. The study has now been published in “Biophysical Journal”.

The cells of the mouth, nose and intestinal mucosa produce large quantities of a chemical called sialic acid. Many bacteria possess a special transport system...

Im Focus: Newly proposed reference datasets improve weather satellite data quality

UMD, NOAA collaboration demonstrates suitability of in-orbit datasets for weather satellite calibration

"Traffic and weather, together on the hour!" blasts your local radio station, while your smartphone knows the weather halfway across the world. A network of...

Im Focus: Repairing defects in fiber-reinforced plastics more efficiently

Fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) are frequently used in the aeronautic and automobile industry. However, the repair of workpieces made of these composite materials is often less profitable than exchanging the part. In order to increase the lifetime of FRP parts and to make them more eco-efficient, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and the Apodius GmbH want to combine a new measuring device for fiber layer orientation with an innovative laser-based repair process.

Defects in FRP pieces may be production or operation-related. Whether or not repair is cost-effective depends on the geometry of the defective area, the tools...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Multiregional brain on a chip

16.01.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

New technology enables 5-D imaging in live animals, humans

16.01.2017 | Information Technology

Researchers develop environmentally friendly soy air filter

16.01.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>