Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Enhanced zooming on maps

17.02.2012
Road maps and city maps in the Internet could be even more attractive and user-friendly than today.

This is what computer scientists of the University of Würzburg are currently working on. One of their objectives is to develop maps the scale of which changes gradually rather than abruptly when zooming in and out. The first results of the scientists are published in a journal for visualization and computer graphics.


When a region of the road map is scaled up, distortions are created (red). Computer scientists of the University of Würzburg have developed a method (right) which significantly reduces the distortions when compared to the conventional fish-eye technique.
Picture: Jan-Henrik Haunert

Imagine you plan a day trip to the city of Berlin by train. To prepare for the trip, you might take a look at the maps provided by Google or Bing. Where is the train station located in Berlin, which direction should I take for the city center and how will I get to the cathedral? As you are zooming in more deeply on the city map, discovering ever more details – at some point in time, the train station will no longer be displayed on the screen. Where was it again?

"If you use the zoom function of maps in the Internet, you will not get several views of one and the same map; instead, various different maps are presented so that there are sudden changes in the representation," explains Professor Alexander Wolff of the Institute of Computer Science at the University of Würzburg. Therefore, users can easily get disoriented. Wolff and his colleague Jan-Henrik Haunert are going to remedy this problem – by means of maps with a variable scale. The project is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

Enlarging individual regions on city maps

Variable scale – the Würzburg computer scientists have interactive maps in mind, on which individual regions can be viewed at a larger scale. Example: On an Internet map of Würzburg, a tourist would like to have a more detailed view of the streets leading to the Lion Bridge. He selects the respective point and gets an enlarged representation of the desired region. The residual part of the map shown on the screen continues to be displayed so that the total view of the city center is maintained.

Zoom method significantly improved

It has been possible for quite some time to implement this type of representation on the computer, using the so-called fish-eye technique. However, Jan-Henrik Haunert and the computer science student Leon Sering have recently developed a significantly improved method, presented in the December 2011 issue of the journal "IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics".

The fish-eye technique has the following disadvantage: When scaling-up a certain region, the rest of the map is highly distorted. With the method of the Würzburg computer scientists, this distortion can be significantly reduced – by about 75 percent. By means of an even better variant of this method, the processing time of the computer for calculating the zoom operation can be reduced by half: In this case, only the area directly around the enlarged region is distorted. Here, the deformation is still 65 percent smaller when compared to the fish-eye technique.

Processing time must be shortened

Let’s consider processing time: At the moment, it takes several seconds, for instance, to calculate the city map of Würzburg anew with a desired scaled-up region. This may be acceptable to someone who just needs a one-time printout of a map. But it is far too slow for users browsing a city map in the Internet and it is obviously not fast enough for real-time applications in navigation systems. Furthermore, the technique is not suited to be used in smart phones either. "It is still based on extensive convex programming, for which smart phones do not have enough processing power," says Professor Wolff.

Creating animated transitions between maps

So the method with the variable scale must be made faster. Over the coming three years, the computer scientists intend to achieve this target and some additional objectives in their DFG project. They also want to eliminate other effects that are likely to confuse users of interactive maps – such as the fact that the labels and the type of representation are subject to abrupt changes during zoom operations. For instance, users can get confused when the train station, which is initially represented as a point, suddenly changes into a large structure of railway tracks and buildings.

"As a solution to this problem, we are going to create animations that will allow smooth transitions between individual maps and different scales," says Jan Haunert. "The generalization of the data is the fundamental problem here." Generalization means in this case: For the animation, a detailed map together with its labels must be simplified step by step. When zooming, the user should finally get the impression that he is smoothly gliding along on one single map instead of switching from map to map and jumping from scale to scale. Then, it would be much more pleasant to plan a day trip to Berlin.

Project in the Internet Research Center

The DFG project of Alexander Wolff and Jan-Henrik Haunert is located at the Internet Research Center of the University of Würzburg. At this research center, computer scientists, psychologist and legal scholars focus on topics such as innovative web applications and a modern architecture of the World Wide Web.

“Drawing Road Networks with Focus Regions”, Jan-Henrik Haunert and Leon Sering, IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, Vol. 17, Issue 12, 2555-2562, December 2011, DOI 10.1109/TVCG.2011.191

Read the publication: http://www1.informatik.uni-wuerzburg.de/pub/haunert/pdf/HaunertSering2011.pdf

Links

Further information on the research at the Department of Computer Science I at the University of Würzburg: http://www1.informatik.uni-wuerzburg.de/en/research/

To the Internet Research Center of the University of Würzburg: http://ircwiki.informatik.uni-wuerzburg.de/

Contact

Prof. Dr. Alexander Wolff, Department of Computer Science, University of Würzburg, T + 49 931 31-85055

Dr. Jan-Henrik Haunert, Department of Computer Science, University of Würzburg, T + 49 931 31-88668

Robert Emmerich | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-wuerzburg.de/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Smarter robot vacuum cleaners for automated office cleaning
15.08.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Researchers 3-D print first truly microfluidic 'lab on a chipl devices
15.08.2017 | Brigham Young University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

Im Focus: Scientists improve forecast of increasing hazard on Ecuadorian volcano

Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and the Instituto Geofisico--Escuela Politecnica Nacional (IGEPN) of Ecuador, showed an increasing volcanic danger on Cotopaxi in Ecuador using a powerful technique known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR).

The Andes region in which Cotopaxi volcano is located is known to contain some of the world's most serious volcanic hazard. A mid- to large-size eruption has...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New thruster design increases efficiency for future spaceflight

16.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Transporting spin: A graphene and boron nitride heterostructure creates large spin signals

16.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

A new method for the 3-D printing of living tissues

16.08.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>