Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Efficient Processing of Big Data on a Daily Routine Basis

10.06.2014

Computer systems today can be found in nearly all areas of life, from smartphones to smart cars to self-organized production facilities.

These computer systems supply rapidly growing data volumes. Computer science now faces the challenge of processing these huge amounts of data (big data) in a reasonable and secure manner. The new priority program “Algorithms for Big Data” (SPP 1736) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) is aimed at developing more efficient computing operations. The Institute of Theoretical Informatics of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is involved in four of 15 partial projects of this SPP.   


By means of an algorithm, increasing networking of students on Facebook can be displayed according to their age. (Graphics: Michael Hamann, KIT)

As a result of new mobile technologies, such as smartphones or tablet PCs, use of computer systems increased rapidly in the past years. These systems produce increasing amounts of data of variable structure. However, adequate programs for processing these data are lacking. “The algorithms known so far are not designed for processing the huge data volumes associated with many problems. The new priority program is aimed at developing theoretically sound methods that can be applied in practice,” explains Assistant Professor Henning Meyerhenke, KIT.

So far, research relating to big data has focused on scientific applications, such as computer-supported simulations for weather forecasts. Now, KIT researchers are working on solutions to enhance the efficiency of computing processes, which can be applied on a daily routine basis. Examples are search queries on the internet or the structural analysis of social networks.

... more about:
»Algorithms »Big Data »SPP »encoding »networks »processing

Four KIT research groups participate in the priority program.

The priority program “Algorithms for Big Data” that is funded by the DFG for a period of six years covers several projects all over Germany. Among these projects are four of the KIT Institute of Theoretical Informatics.

The project “Rapid Inexact Combinatorial and Algebraic Solvers for Large Networks” of Assistant Professor Henning Meyerhenke addresses complex problems encountered in large networks. The tasks to be solved are motivated by biological applications. For example, individuals of a species can be networked according to the similarity of their genome and then classified. The new processes help classify the data arising with a reduced calculation expenditure. In this way, it is easier for biologists to derive new findings.

In the project “Scalable Cryptography” of Assistant Professor Dennis Hofheinz (KIT) and Professor Eike Klitz (Ruhr-Universität Bochum), work focuses on the security of big data. Cryptographic methods, such as encoding or digital signatures, guarantee security also in case of big data volumes. However, existing methods are difficult to adapt to the new tasks. The security provided by the RSA-OAEP encoding method used in conventional internet browsers, for instance, is insufficient in case of big data. “We are looking for a solution that stably guarantees security even in case of an increasing number of accesses and users,” says Assistant Professor Dennis Hofheinz, who is member of the Cryptography and Security Working Group at the KIT.

The increasingly growing social networks, such as Facebook or Twitter, produce large data accumulations. At the same time, these data are of high economic and political value. The project “Clustering in Social Online Networks” of Professor Dorothea Wagner (KIT) and Professor Ulrik Brandes (Universität Konstanz) starts at this point. With the help of new algorithms, the development of online communities in social networks shall be reproduced.

To search a big volume of data e.g. on the internet, a functioning tool, such as a good search machine, is indispensable. “The search machines used today can be further improved by algorithms of increased efficiency,” Professor Peter Sanders says, who also conducts research at the Institute of Theoretical Informatics. Within the framework of his project “Text Indexing for Big Data”, Sanders, together with Professor Johannes Fischer of the Technical University of Dortmund, is looking for optimization options. In particular, they plan to use many processors at the same time, while searching of data in strongly compressed form shall remain possible.

Big Data at the KIT

The topic of Big Data is of high relevance in various application scenarios. Not only science, but also users of new technologies are increasingly facing so far unknown problems. To manage these problems, the KIT works on various Big Data projects apart from SPP 1736. For instance, KIT is partner of the Helmholtz project “Large Scale Data Management and Analysis” (LSDMA). This project pools various competences in handling big data, as it covers effective acquisition, storage, distribution, analysis, visualization, and archiving of data.

In addition, the KIT has been operating the Smart Data Innovation Lab (SDIL), a platform for Big Data research, since 2014. The SDIL reaches highest performance and can be used in practice by industry and science. 

http://www.kit.edu/kit/english/pi_2014_15153.php

Monika Landgraf | AlphaGalileo

Further reports about: Algorithms Big Data SPP encoding networks processing

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Hey robot, shimmy like a centipede
22.07.2016 | Kyoto University

nachricht New nanoscale technologies could revolutionize microscopes, study of disease
20.07.2016 | University of Missouri-Columbia

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

Im Focus: A Peek into the “Birthing Room” of Ribosomes

Scaffolding and specialised workers help with the delivery – Heidelberg biochemists gain new insights into biogenesis

A type of scaffolding on which specialised workers ply their trade helps in the manufacturing process of the two subunits from which the ribosome – the protein...

Im Focus: New protocol enables analysis of metabolic products from fixed tissues

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a new mass spectrometry imaging method which, for the first time, makes it possible to analyze hundreds of metabolites in fixed tissue samples. Their findings, published in the journal Nature Protocols, explain the new access to metabolic information, which will offer previously unexploited potential for tissue-based research and molecular diagnostics.

In biomedical research, working with tissue samples is indispensable because it permits insights into the biological reality of patients, for example, in...

Im Focus: Computer Simulation Renders Transient Chemical Structures Visible

Chemists at the University of Basel have succeeded in using computer simulations to elucidate transient structures in proteins. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the researchers set out how computer simulations of details at the atomic level can be used to understand proteins’ modes of action.

Using computational chemistry, it is possible to characterize the motion of individual atoms of a molecule. Today, the latest simulation techniques allow...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

Partner countries of FAIR accelerator meet in Darmstadt and approve developments

11.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Hey robot, shimmy like a centipede

22.07.2016 | Information Technology

New record in materials research: 1 terapascals in a laboratory

22.07.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

University of Graz researchers challenge 140-year-old paradigm of lichen symbiosis

22.07.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>