Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Drones can almost see in the dark

20.09.2017

UZH researchers have taught drones how to fly using an eye-inspired camera, opening the door to them performing fast, agile maneuvers and flying in low-light environments. Possible applications could include supporting rescue teams with search missions at dusk or dawn.

To fly safely, drones need to know their precise position and orientation in space at all times. While commercial drones solve this problem using GPS, this only works outdoors, and is not very reliable, especially in urban environments.


Drone with an eye-inspired camera.

Image: UZH


Unlike their conventional counterparts, event cameras only report changes in brightness for each pixel.

Image: UZH

Furthermore, the conventional cameras mounted on drones work only when there is a high amount of light available, and the drone’s speed has to be limited otherwise the resulting image is motion-blurred and cannot be used by computer vision algorithms. To solve this problem, professional drones use sensors that are elaborate, expensive, and bulky, such as laser scanners.

First combination of artificial intelligence and robotics

A group of researchers from the University of Zurich and the Swiss research consortium NCCR Robotics has now developed an innovative alternative approach, enabling drones to fly in a wide range of conditions using an eye-inspired camera that can easily cope with high-speed motion.

It can even see in the dark much more effectively than the conventional cameras currently used by all commercial drones. “This research is the first of its kind in the fields of artificial intelligence and robotics, and will soon enable drones to fly autonomously and faster than ever, including in low-light environments,” says Prof. Davide Scaramuzza, Director of the Robotics and Perception Group at UZH. He and his team have already taught drones to use their onboard cameras to infer their position and orientation in space.

Camera captures light changes for each pixel

Event cameras, which were invented at UZH together with ETH Zurich, do not need to capture full light on the entire bio-inspired retina in order to have a clear picture. Unlike their conventional counterparts, they only report changes in brightness for each pixel, ensuring perfectly sharp vision even during fast motion or in low-light environments. The UZH researchers have also de-signed new software able to efficiently process the output from such cameras, harnessing this to enable autonomous flight at higher speeds and in lower light than currently possible with com-mercial drones.

Drones equipped with an event camera and the software designed by the Swiss researchers could assist search and rescue teams in scenarios where conventional drones would be of no use – for example on missions at dusk or dawn or when there is too little light for normal cameras to work. They would also be able to fly faster in disaster areas, where time is critical in saving survivors.

Prototype ready for the future

“There is still a lot of work to be done before these drones can be deployed in the real world since the event camera used for our research is an early prototype. We have yet to prove that our soft-ware also works reliably outdoors,” says PhD Student Henri Rebecq. And Professor Scaramuzza adds: “We think this is achievable, however, and our recent work has already demonstrated that combining a standard camera with an event-based camera improves the accuracy and reliability of the system.”

Literature:
Antoni Rosinol Vidal, Henri Rebecq, Timo Horstschaefer, Davide Scaramuzza. Hybrid, Frame and Event-based Visual Inertial Odometry for Robust, Autonomous Navigation of Quadrotors. IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, September 19, 2017.

Video UZH Flying Robots: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=GZ1L9gXPfvc

Melanie Nyfeler | Universität Zürich
Further information:
http://www.media.uzh.ch/en/Press-Releases/2017/Drones-in-the-dark.html

Further reports about: ETH ETH Zurich GPs Robotics Robots UZH laser scanners sharp vision

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht New epidemic management system combats monkeypox outbreak in Nigeria
15.12.2017 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

nachricht Gecko adhesion technology moves closer to industrial uses
13.12.2017 | Georgia Institute of Technology

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

15.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

15.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

New antbird species discovered in Peru by LSU ornithologists

15.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>