Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Computing squared

07.08.2008
Computing pundits claim that we are moving into a world of ubiquitous computing. In this brave new world, your refrigerator and store cupboard will be connected to your internet shopping accounts so that you need never run out of milk or sugar again.

Sensors around your home and workplace will respond to workloads, weather and even your mood by adjusting heating, lighting, and sound levels. Diagnostic devices built into door handles or the bathroom might alert your doctor or the emergency services to changes in your health.

How this emerging technology will be woven into the fabric of society and our everyday living spaces is an open question but ultimately people, rather than computer screens and keyboards will projected into the foreground.

Writing in the International Journal of Autonomous and Adaptive Communications Systems, Maja Pantic of Imperial College London, Anton Nijholt of the University of Twente, The Netherlands, Alex Pentland, of the Media Lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Thomas Huanag of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, explain that for computing to become all-pervasive and useful, it, rather than we, must adapt to our natural way of living, communicating, and working.

"Next-generation computing should develop anticipatory user interfaces that are human-centred, built for humans and based on naturally occurring ways people communicate," the researchers say. The new computer interfaces will go way beyond the traditional keyboard and mouse and be able to understand and emulate people as well as recognising behavioural cues, such as body language, facial expressions, tone of voice and other social signals.

The researchers describe just how close we are to the goal of human-centred computing and Human-Centred Intelligent Human-Computer Interaction (HCI-squared).

So far, computers and the internet have become so embedded in the daily fabric of people's lives, in the developed world and in some parts of the developing world, that they simply cannot live without them. New technology is an essential part of our work, our communications, shopping, finding information, and entertainment. "These processes shift human activity away from real physical objects, emphasising virtual over physical environments," the researchers explain.

In order to create technology based on the HCI-squared concept, there has to be a paradigm shift in our approach to computing. Most of the present approaches to machine analysis of human behaviour are neither, such as facial expressions and the spoken word, are neither context-sensitive, nor able to handle long timescales.

"The focus of future research efforts in the field should be primarily on tackling the problem," the researchers conclude, "This problem should be treated as one complex problem rather than a number of detached problems in human sensing, context sensing and human behaviour understanding." Only then will we see truly ubiquitous computing that fulfils its promise of improving our lives, social conditions, and healthcare.

Albert Ang | alfa
Further information:
http://www.inderscience.com

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Deep Learning predicts hematopoietic stem cell development
21.02.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Sensors embedded in sports equipment could provide real-time analytics to your smartphone
16.02.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>