Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A Pacesetter on the Information Superhighway: The DFG Provides Access to Additional Digital Research Resources

12.12.2008
Whether they are looking for a groundbreaking article in the journal Science, a periodical held by the British Library, a journal published by Cambridge University Press or the art catalogue of a museum in New York, scientists and researchers at German universities and research institutions will soon have access to a much larger and more varied range of digital information sources.

This free access to 20 additional major databases and journal archives will be possible due to new national licenses funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) The DFG is providing 6.5 million euros to purchase the licenses and an additional 3.4 million euros for its Digital Information Initiative. These measures were approved by the Joint Committee of the DFG, Germany’s main research funding organisation.

“By funding access to additional databases and major journal archives through the purchase of national licenses the DFG is pursuing its efforts to boost digital research in Germany,” said Dr. Anne Lipp, Head of the Scientific Library Services and Information Systems Division at the DFG’s Head Office.

The new research resources, which will become available by May 2009, include international full-text databases such as the Science Classic archive, which provides full-text access to all issues of the well-known magazine published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, from its first issue, published in 1880, up until 1996. In future it will be possible to search previous issues on-screen instantly – a first-class source of information for researchers and scientists. The digital collection Early American Newspapers, which contains 2,000 U.S. newspapers dating from 1690 to 1922, is also expected to be of great interest. The same applies to the collection of British Library Newspapers (17th-19th centuries), which contains approximately 3.2 million pages. Both of these newspaper archives open up opportunities for study that are by no means only of interest to researchers from the humanities and social sciences.

This year’s national license purchase is given a special note thanks to the DFG’s Digital Information Initiative. This aims to promote access to electronic journal archives and databases that could not be accessed using national licenses in the past due to copyright restriction. The great demand for access to these archives expressed by various scientific communities prompted the DFG to promote this under a special funding initiative.

One example of the digital resources covered by this initiative is the journal archive JSTOR (Journal STORage, www.jstor.org), an archive operated by a not-for-profit organisation of the same name based in New York, which has created an interdisciplinary online archive of technical and scientific journals which are accessible for a fee. The research database, which has been built up over several years, contains over 800 academic journals from a total of 563 publishers, making it an information cosmos encompassing some 25 million pages. The online archive ARTstor (www.artstor.org) is of similar quality. It provides access to approximately 700,000 images from North American museums and art collections, making it a digital photo database that is of interest far beyond the art world.

The long-term goal of the DFG’s funding initiative is to boost the provision of Germany’s national library and information services with digital media. The DFG first funded the purchase of national licenses for electronic databases and journal archives from international academic publishers in 2004. The 1,010 databases, major collections of texts and journal archives for which access has been purchased by way of national licenses to date encompass all areas of science and academia and are useful to researchers from every discipline – in an aim to boost Germany as a location for research and its international competitiveness.

Jutta Hoehn | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nationallizenzen.de
http://www.dfg.de
http://www.dfg.de/lis/nationallicenses

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Magnetic Quantum Objects in a "Nano Egg-Box"
25.07.2017 | Universität Wien

nachricht 3-D scanning with water
24.07.2017 | Association for Computing Machinery

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>