Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

World Conference on Biology Behind Food Security

17.09.2010
More than 220 international scientists will meet at a conference in Adelaide, Australia next week (19-24 September) to discuss the biology of plant membranes, an understanding of which is crucial to developing crops that will feed us into the future.

"Agriculture today is tough. According to a recent UN report we will need to produce more food in the next 50 years than we have in the last 10,000, but environmental issues like drought and salinity are limiting crop yields and food production," said conference convenor Dr Matthew Gilliham from the University of Adelaide's Waite Research Institute.

"Humanity is not likely to meet these challenges through more cows, sheep and fish, but rather through improved plants that can grow better in harsh conditions with limited resources. Understanding how plants work is crucial to ensuring a secure food supply," he said.

Presentations at the conference will discuss the science underpinning how plants acquire and use water and nutrients, and how they survive in marginal environments. Topics will include the tolerance of plants to soils affected by salt, aluminum, boron and drought, and increasing plant production through improving nutrient and water use efficiency.

"These are major issues for world agricultural production today due to climate change and increasing fertilizer prices," Dr Gilliham said.

Leading scientists in these areas will converge on Adelaide from around the world, including Japan, USA, France, Germany, UK and Saudi Arabia.

The conference – the 15th International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology (IWPMB) – is organized by members of the Waite Research Institute at the University of Adelaide and the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG). Being held at the National Wine Centre, Adelaide, the opening plenary lecture will be presented by Professor Wolf Frommer from the Carnegie Institution for Science, USA.

"This is the world’s premier conference in its field," Dr Gilliham said. "Held on a triennial basis for the last 45 years, scientists representing the world’s leading research laboratories meet to present and discuss their cutting-edge research and the field’s recent developments.

"These meetings are important because they help to generate discussion and understanding of plant processes that will lead to improved knowledge, and eventually improved crops," he said.

The conference is also a satellite meeting of OZBIO2010.

More information about the conference, including a full program, can be found here: www.adelaide.edu.au/iwpmb2010/

Media contact:

Dr Matthew Gilliham
Conference Convenor
Waite Research Institute
The University of Adelaide
Work: +61 8 8303 8145
Cell phone: +61 431 663 614
matthew.gilliham@adelaide.edu.au

Dr Matthew Gilliham | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.adelaide.edu.au

More articles from Event News:

nachricht “Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application
19.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers
12.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionsanlagen und Konstruktionstechnik IPK

All articles from Event News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Glycosylation: Mapping Uncharted Territory

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

21.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

Did marine sponges trigger the ‘Cambrian explosion’ through ‘ecosystem engineering’?

21.09.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>