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SETAC Europe Addresses Global Ecosystem Health in Gothenburg

28.05.2009
The Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry will host 1550 scientists from around the world to address the theme of "Protecting Ecosystem Health: Facing the Challenge of a Globally Changing Environment," May 31 - June 4 at the Gothenburg Convention Centre, Sweden.

Nanotechnology's impacts on the environment, risks from new pharmaceuticals, effects of contaminants at the molecular level, polar ecotoxicology, and the interaction of contaminants and climate change are some of the challenges on the agenda at this 19th annual meeting of SETAC Europe.

Keynote speakers from across the globe are scheduled daily to present a broad range of topics: Sunday 31 May, Christina Rudén from the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm will discuss "Risk assessment for a sustainable chemical use - Within REACH, and beyond"; Monday 1 June Tom Hutchinson from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory in England will share his views on "Our seas, our health, our wealth - the human wildlife connection".

Tuesday 2 June, Mohiuddin Munawar from the Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries & Aquatic Sciences, Fisheries & Oceans in Canada will address "Probing Aquatic Ecosystem Health: A journey through the Great Lakes"; and Wednesday 3 June, Tinka Murk from Wageningen University and the Dutch Marine Research Institute will discuss "Assessing ecotoxicological impacts in differing and changing environments".

Other meeting highlights include the final symposium of the European Union Coordinated Action for Innovation in Life Cycle Analysis for Sustainability, a special symposium on emerging chemicals, and sessions on environmental regulation such as the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemical substances and the European Water Framework Directive.

SETAC's balance among business, academia and government will also be represented in hundreds of presentations on ecotoxicology, environmental and analytical chemistry, life cycle assessment and management, marine ecosystems, nanomaterials, pharmaceuticals, risk assessment and regulations, and threats to terrestrial ecosystems.

SETAC is a not-for-profit, worldwide professional society founded in 1979, consisting of individuals and institutions from an array of scientific fields including environmental toxicology and chemistry, biology, ecology, earth sciences, atmospheric sciences, health sciences, hazard and risk assessment, environmental engineering and life-cycle assessment.

The SETAC Europe geographic unit, one of four within SETAC, serves 1,500 members in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. For more information on SETAC, visit setac.org. For information on the SETAC Europe meeting, visit http://goteborg.setac.eu/

Media contact for the Swedish speaking press:
Göran Dave
Meeting Chair
E-mail: goran.dave@dpes.gu.se
Tel.: 0046 31786 37 76
Mobile: 0046 70566 66 56
Media contact for the English, Dutch and French speaking press:
Katrien Arijs
Acting Executive Director & Scientific Affairs Manager
SETAC Europe
E-mail: katrien.arijs@setac.org
Tel.: 0032 2 772 72 81
Mobile: 0032 473 92 78 39
Maud Collée
Communication Specialist
SETAC Europe
E-mail: maud.collee@setac.org
Tel.: 0032 2 772 72 81
Mobile: 0032 470 55 34 38

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://goteborg.setac.eu/
http://www.science.gu.se/english/News/News_detail?contentId=882052

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