Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Day 3 Euroscience Open Forum 2008: highlights

21.07.2008
Nanotechnology applications in medicine may carry toxicity risks, Dr Hermann Stamm of the DG Joint Research Centre, European Commission, tells the Euroscience Open Forum 2008 (ESOF2008) in Barcelona today.

While applications of nanotechnology in medicine have great potential to improve healthcare by earlier and better diagnosis there are possible risks to our health, Dr Hermann Stamm of the Joint Research Centre, European Commission, will today tell the Euroscience Open Forum 2008 in Barcelona.

“Nanotechnology must be applied in a safe and secure way, in order to fully develop the exciting opportunities for application in life science and other fields,” said Stamm.

“Discussion around Nanotechnology and any possible health risks linked to its application is just one field where the challenges of communicating them to the public and stressing the need for informed decisions must be based on sound science,” said ESOF2008 Co-Chair and Euroscience President Enric Banda. “One of the goals of ESOF2008 is to communicate to the general public the impacts of science on their daily lives,” concluded Banda.

Nanotechnology and health: promises and risks

“In general our regulatory frameworks for nanomaterials seem sufficiently broad and flexible to handle most developments”, reassures Hermann Stamm. “But the most prominent risk to health arises from the unknown toxicity of engineered nanomaterials, for example in the use of nanoparticles transported in the body’s tissue which allow for the development of novel pharmaceuticals. These raise concerns of adverse health effects which arise from greater toxicity than expected from the elemental composition” said Stamm.

‘Mars and Venus’ – how Europeans and Americans view and use science

“Is greater and closer collaboration between the US and Europe the key to overall success for science in the face of global competition?” is the question that Alan Leshner will pose in the ‘Mars and Venus’ Session at the Euroscience Open Forum 2008 in Barcelona. “Both the US and Europe face new challenges on how science is viewed and used – from stem cells to climate change. But there continues to be tension between scientific information and political direction. With stakeholders from big business to the media pitching different views, citizens are left wondering who they can really trust?” said Leshner.

"The European Union and the United States of America form a unique relationship as international partners in science,” Roland Schenkel, Director General, DG Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission, will tell delegates. “Our approaches to scientific research and development can be different but we share common interests and goals. We are also faced by the same evolving global challenges. It is vital that we learn from each other in facing them together”, said Schenkel.

Maths – art or science?

“Is mathematics a creative art or useful science?” will be the question posed by the leading mathematician and gifted public communicator Marcus Du Sautoy, a Plenary speaker at Euroscience Open Forum 2008. He will explore the role of maths as the key to many of the greatest scientific and technological advances made throughout the ages. Du Sautoy will also look at how maths underpins many of the steps that artists exploit in their creative processes, taking the mathematical structures hiding behind such great works like the Alhambra and Bach’s Goldberg Variations as examples.

Smart energy homes

‘Will people be prepared to pay more to live in a Smart Energy Home which is self sufficient, or even a net positive, energy generator not requiring an external energy source and not emitting CO2?’ is one of the key questions Sean McWhinnie, an expert on smart energy homes, will raise at the Euroscience Open Forum 2008. “Our session will show that science and technology can be used in such a way as to persuade people to want to live in smart energy homes”, said McWhinnie.

Michael Kessler | alfa
Further information:
http://www.jrc.ec.europa.eu
http://www.esof2008.org

More articles from Event News:

nachricht See, understand and experience the work of the future
11.12.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms
08.12.2017 | Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

All articles from Event News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cellular Self-Digestion Process Triggers Autoimmune Disease

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>