Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Innovative conference attracts international audience

27.02.2008
Students will get the chance to present their research to leading environmental and human rights experts at The University of Nottingham. The Annual Student Human Rights Conference brings together more than 100 students from all over Europe, giving them the unique chance to meet experts in their chosen field.

In its ninth successful year, this year’s event takes place on Saturday 8 March and focuses on international human rights and the environment. It will feature four keynote speakers; Mr MC Mehta, Indian Supreme Court Advocate and leading human rights activist; Professor Malgosia Fitzmaurice of Queen Mary University London, a committee member of International Water Resources; Emilie Filmer-Wilson, human rights expert for the United Nations Development Programme, and Simon Baughen, Reader in Law at the University of Bristol.

Student panellists from countries including Nigeria, The Netherlands, Belgium, Canada, and the UK will make presentations and lead discussions on the following themes;

• Our human environment
• The role of industry and natural resources
• A right to water?
• Is it time to legislate?
Presentations and debate will explore the impact of trade, globalisation and climate change on our understanding of international human rights and the environment, while critically examining the social responsibilities of individuals, corporations and governments in this context. Three students from The University of Nottingham will be presenting on the panel sessions.

The conference’s keynote speakers are well-placed to advise delegates on the complex aspects of international environmental law, particularly in relation to human rights. Mr Mehta’s landmark environmental cases in India have resulted in the protection of some of the country’s natural and cultural treasures, including the Ganges river and the Taj Mahal. He has also set up the MC Mehta Environmental Foundation, a not-for-profit, non-governmental organisation fighting for environmental and citizens’ rights in India. Professor Fitzmaurice holds the Chair in Public International Law at Queen Mary University and is a widely-published expert in international environmental law and the law of treaties, particularly in regard to the right to water. Simon Baughen is an expert on maritime and environmental law, and has recently published a leading textbook on international trade, corporate responsibility and the protection of the environment. Emilie Filmer-Wilson, who attended the conference as a student panellist in 2004, returns as a keynote speaker to address the issue of integrating human rights into environmental programmes, a key focus of the UN Development Programme.

Emilie Hunter, Research and Programmes Coordinator of the Human Rights Law Centre said: “The relationship between the environment and human rights touches on issues which will become a key research focus in the future; with a direct impact on each and every human and the way we live our lives. Our conference, organised by students from the School of Law, aims to raise these important issues with students, academics and practitioners from different disciplines across the university, the UK and throughout Europe with lawyers, engineers and scientists.”

For more information on the conference, visit www.nottingham.ac.uk/law/hrlc/student-activities/annual-student-conference.php.

Emma Thorne | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/

More articles from Event News:

nachricht International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open
20.03.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für ökologische Raumentwicklung e. V.

nachricht CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue
14.03.2017 | Universität Ulm

All articles from Event News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>