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IT security in the digital society

27.08.2014

Open Identity Summit 2014 focuses on identity management, cloud computing and data protection.

In the age of big data, industry 4.0 and cloud computing, IT security for enterprises and consumers is growing ever more important.

At the Open Identity Summit 2014, experts from these research fields will be joined by industry representatives with practical experience to present solutions for secure identity management and technologies designed to enhance data protection.

It is clear to see from recent data theft scandals, just how critical the subject IT security has already become for the business world. Robust identity management, in particular, plays a key role in the secure handling of data because it regulates who has access to what data – and how to ensure that those accessing the data really are who they claim to be.

This is of special concern when it comes to cloud computing. “For small companies, in particular, a server in the cloud can be much more secure than a proprietary network,” explains Dr. Heiko Rossnagel, who is responsible for the Open Identity Summit 2014 at Fraunhofer IAO.

Cloud computing is just one of the identity management topics that will be discussed at the Open Identity Summit from November 4 to 6, 2014. This forum will also consider legal and economic aspects, technologies that promote data protection, and open standards and interfaces.

By bringing together the viewpoints of both scientific experts and business practitioners, the summit can offer participants a holistic approach to these highly topical issues. The conference will kick off on the Tuesday with a SkIDentity project workshop.

The results of this project, which is sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology, show how to bridge the gap between secure electronic IDs and existing cloud computing infrastructure. During the workshop, participants will be presented with a variety of demonstrators and have an opportunity to talk with practitioners in these areas.

From Wednesday onward, the Open Identity Summit will offer both a series of scientific lectures and a range of case-study presentations from industry representatives on selected topics. An accompanying exhibition will enable the attendees to get to know the latest solutions for identity management and IT security.

All of this – in combination with keynote speeches, specialist presentations and a panel discussion – will give the participants an ample opportunity to network with experts, providers and users. 

The attendance fee for the entire conference is €545; those attending only the first two days will pay €345. The deadline for registration is October 29, 2014, with a discount for those registering before October 6.

Contact:
Eray Özmü
Identity Management
Fraunhofer IAO
Nobelstraße 12
70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Telefon: +49 711 970-2430
E-Mail: eray.oezmue@iao.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

https://anmeldung.iao.fraunhofer.de/registration.php?id=572
http://www.openidentity.eu

Juliane Segedi | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

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