Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

BrainScaleS Conference: From Neurobiology to New Computer Architectures

25.09.2014

European research network to hold final conference at the Kirchhoff Institute for Physics

The European BrainScaleS project has made groundbreaking progress over the last four years by linking neuroscientific findings with mathematical modelling and developing innovative computer architectures.

To review the major project results and explore them in the context of worldwide research in this field, researchers will gather for the 4th Frontiers in Neuromorphic Computing Conference on 2 October 2014, hosted by the Kirchhoff Institute for Physics of Heidelberg University. In addition to researchers from the interdisciplinary research network of 17 European partners, renowned scientists from the USA, Canada, Japan and Switzerland are also expected to attend this final BrainScaleS conference.

The BrainScaleS project, which was funded by the European Union with 9.2 million euros, represents an intensive interdisciplinary collaboration between experimental and theoretical neuroscientists, engineers and physicists. The project revolved around the design and implementation of so-called demonstrators, in which specific cognitive tasks of biological systems from neurobiology are taken and implemented in synthetic networks.

The spectrum ranges from simple perception and perception-action loops to abstract, function-driven neuronal networks. The conceptual work in the project provide the inspiration for the construction of new types of computers that differ fundamentally from the established Von Neumann architecture of standard digital computers. The result was a neuromorphic computer whose architecture is comparable only to that developed at IBM Research – Almaden in the USA and the University of Manchester (Great Britain).

International speakers at the Frontiers in Neuromorphic Computing Conference are Palm Computing founder Jeff Hawkins, who now heads the Numenta start-up firm in Silicon Valley, and the Director of the Center for Neural Science at New York University, Tony Movshon.

The list of speakers also features Chris Eliasmith, author of the book “How to Build a Brain,” Tomoki Fukai from the RIKEN research institution in Japan and Sam Gershman from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Also expected is Thomas Schulthess of ETH Zurich, the director of Europe’s most powerful supercomputer.

The BrainScaleS project is one of the pillars of the European Human Brain Project (HBP) launched a year ago; Heidelberg University will also host the HBP’s annual conference from 29 September to 1 October 2014. The Heidelberg working group led by Prof. Dr. Karlheinz Meier initiated and directed BrainScaleS.

Note to news desks:
Media representatives are cordially invited to attend and report on the conference, which will be held in English. Please register in advance at: https://brainscales.kip.uni-heidelberg.de/jss/AttendMeeting?eMAt=49

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Karlheinz Meier
Kirchhoff Institute for Physics
Phone: +49 6221 54-9830
meierk@kip.uni-heidelberg.de

Communications and Marketing
Press Office
Phone: +49 6221 54-2311
presse@rektorat.uni-heidelberg.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://brainscales.kip.uni-heidelberg.de

Marietta Fuhrmann-Koch | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Event News:

nachricht See, understand and experience the work of the future
11.12.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms
08.12.2017 | Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

All articles from Event News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cellular Self-Digestion Process Triggers Autoimmune Disease

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>