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BALTIC 2014: Baltic Sea Geologists meet in Warnemünde

03.09.2014

Following an invitation of the marine geologists from the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research around 100 scientists out of all Baltic Sea countries will meet from September 9 to 11 at the BALTIC 2014, the 12th Colloquium on Baltic Sea Marine Geology, to exchange their latest results and to discuss new insights.

The focus of the in total 48 oral presentations is set on the Baltic Sea and its postglacial development. With a broad range of geological methods applied, a most comprehensive knowledge of the paleoenvironment of the past millenia is strived for.

The goal is to recognize changes and their underlying mechanisms in order to draw conclusions on potential future developments. Accordingly, the conference will be opened by a lecture of the Norwegian climate researcher Eystein Jansen who worked as a lead author on the chapter „Information on Paleoclimate Archives“ within the last assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

With respect to the Baltic Sea, the relevant archives for paleoclimate data are the constantly changing coastal zones and the sea floor sediments. Each new method and each investigated region adds new pieces in our mozaic-like understanding of the geological history of the Baltic Sea.

„It is the scientific exchange which merges single insights into a complete picture. For this reason, this biannual conference is of high importance for us”, explains Helge Arz head of the IOW department “Marine Geology” and the host of the conference.

Beside the reconstruction of the paleoenvironment, topics like coastal changes and sea level rise, sea floor mapping, and environmental pollution under human influence are tackled.

A poster session is preferentially reserved for the results of young scientists. A jury will award the best presentation among them. Further information is available under:

http://www.io-warnemuende.de/conference-bsg2014-home.html

Contact:

Prof. Dr. Helge Arz, Department Marine Geology,

Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, phone: +49 381 5197 350

Dr. Matthias Moros, Department Marine Geology,

Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, phone: +49 381 5197 399

Dr. Thomas Leipe, Department Marine Geology,

Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, phone: +49 381 5197 381

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch, Press officer,

Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, phone: +49 381 5197 102

The IOW is a member of the Leibniz Association to which 89 research institutes and scientific infrastructure facilities for research currently belong. The focus of the Leibniz Institutes ranges from Natural, Engineering and Environmental Science to Economic, Social, and Space Sciences and to the humanities. The institutes are jointly financed at the state and national levels. The Leibniz Institutes employ a total of 17.500 people, of whom 8.800 are scientists, of which 3.300 are junior scientists. The total budget of the Institutes is more than 1.53 billion Euros. Third-party funds amount to approximately € 350 million per year. (www.leibniz-gemeinschaft.de)

Dr. Barbara Hentzsch | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

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