Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Unlocking the Mysteries of the Real Paddington Bear

21.01.2015

WCS and Partners Publish Key Contributions for Andean Bear Conservation throughout the Tropical Andes

• New maps show mysterious bear’s historical range and current conservation strongholds
• Andean bears live in “fairytale” cloud forests of Latin America
• Recommendations to mitigate human-bear conflicts and livestock loss
• WCS’s Queens Zoo has Andean bears on exhibit


Robert Wallace/WCS

WCS and partners in Bolivia, Colombia, and Peru have published four significant contributions towards the conservation of the real Paddington Bear – the Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus).

WCS and partners in Bolivia, Colombia, and Peru have published four significant contributions towards the conservation of the real Paddington Bear – the Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus).

Shrouded in mystery, the Andean bear calls home the fairytale-like cloud forests of the Tropical Andes that run from Venezuela to Bolivia. The biology and ecology of this species is poorly known despite its symbolic and cultural significance in the region and its role as a conservation flagship for the threatened montane forests and upland grasslands of the Andes.

The publication, “Andean Bear Priority Conservation Units in Bolivia and Peru” represents a fundamental contribution to scientific knowledge and conservation of this species. Edited by Dr. Robert Wallace of WCS, with the participation of 25 experts in the field, supported by WCS, the Center for Biodiversity and Genetics from the University of San Simón in Bolivia, the University Cayetano Heredia in Peru and the University of Antwerp in Belgium, the publication provides data on the distribution of the species and assessed its conservation status.

One thousand sixty-six known distribution points of Andean bears in Bolivia and Peru were summarized in 27 maps including: historical range, areas with and without expert knowledge, areas where Andean bears no longer occur, priority conservation units and maps of the Human Influence Index and Human Footprint within the Andean bears range. The maps show that 20 percent of the historical range of the bear in Bolivia and Peru is under formal protection, which exceeds the 17 perecent recommended by the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Contributors identified seven Andean Bear Conservation Units that represent the best chance for their long-term conservation by analyzing their conservation status and their connectivity level: three units exist in Peru; one unit links Peru and Bolivia; and three units are in Bolivia. Together, the units represent almost 58 percent of the current distribution range of the species in Bolivia and Peru.

Dr. Wallace, WCS Director of the Greater Madidi-Tambopata Landscape, said: “Bolivia and Peru hold almost 70 percent of Andean bear global distribution, and so this expert-driven analysis is crucial for identifiying population strongholds for this iconic Andean species.”

In Colombia, WCS published two contributions related to the idenification, verification and management of human-Andean bear conflicts: “Guide for the Landscape Diagnostic of Human-Andean Bear Conflicts,” and the “Manual for the Recognition and Evaluation of Livestock Predation Events by Wild Carnivores.” Andean bears are frequently blamed for cattle losses in the remote grasslands of the Andes, and although they are known to very occasionally prey upon cattle, there is no doubt that they receive the blame for more losses than is the case.

Co-author Isaac Goldstein, WCS Andean Bear Program Coordinator, said: “These manuals provide a transparent means of evaluating potential complaints against the Andean bear and provide a clear pathway for managing perceived and actual losses. Developing practical solutions for managing conflicts is a crucial conservation measure for this extremely fragile species.”

In Peru, a “Strategy for the Conservation of Andean Bear in the Historical Sanctuary of Machu Picchu and the Choquequirao Regional Conservation Area” was published by the Peruvian National Parks System (SERNANP), the Regional Government of Cusco, Inkaterra and WCS. The publication recognizes that this iconic area, world famous for its archaeological value, is also important for the conservation of the Andean bear.

Julie Kunen, Executive Director of WCS’s Latin America and Caribbean Programs, said: “Collectively these publications demonstrate our institutional commitment to this magnificent species and the threatened forests and highland grasslands they represent as wildlife ambassadors.”

WCS’s Andean bear conservation work is made possible by the generous contributions from Cleveland Metroparks Zoo and the Cleveland Zoological Society, the Andean Bear Conservation Alliance, and other supporters.”

WCS’s Queens Zoo has Andean bears on exhibit. For more information, visit www.queenszoo.org .

###

Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)
MISSION: WCS saves wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature. VISION: WCS envisions a world where wildlife thrives in healthy lands and seas, valued by societies that embrace and benefit from the diversity and integrity of life on earth. To achieve our mission, WCS, based at the Bronx Zoo, harnesses the power of its Global Conservation Program in more than 60 nations and in all the world’s oceans and its five wildlife parks in New York City, visited by 4 million people annually. WCS combines its expertise in the field, zoos, and aquarium to achieve its conservation mission. Visit: www.wcs.org ; http://www.facebook.com/TheWCS ; http://www.youtube.com/user/WCSMedia  Follow: @thewcs.

Stephen Sautner | newswise

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

nachricht A new indicator for marine ecosystem changes: the diatom/dinoflagellate index
21.08.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>