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First Snow Leopard Cubs Ever Born At Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo Make Their Public Debut

06.11.2013
Twins are on exhibit in Allison Maher Stern Snow Leopard Exhibit

The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo is debuting a pair of snow leopard cubs (Panthera uncia). These are the first snow leopard cubs ever born at the Central Park Zoo and the second snow leopard birth at a WCS zoo this year.


Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society

A pair of snow leopard cubs made their debut at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Central Park Zoo.

The cubs, a male and a female, born this summer, weigh about 30 pounds but are expected to reach between 65-120 pounds.

The litter is the result of the successful pairing of, Zoe, the mother (7), with Askai (6), a male sent to the Central Park Zoo from the Bronx Zoo. Both adults are first-time parents.

Snow leopards first arrived at the WCS Central Park Zoo in 2009 with the opening of the Allison Maher Stern Snow Leopard Exhibit—the result of a leadership gift to WCS from longtime supporters Allison and Leonard Stern, along with support from the City of New York. When the yet unnamed cubs can be seen will vary daily until they fully acclimate to their surroundings.

This is the second snow leopard birth at a Wildlife Conservation Society zoo this year. Last month, WCS introduced a snow leopard cub born at the Bronx Zoo. That cub was sired by Leo – the snow leopard rescued as a young orphaned cub after it was found in the high mountains of northern Pakistan.

The Central Park and Bronx Zoo snow leopards are a part of the Species Survival Plan – a cooperative breeding program administered by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) designed to enhance the genetic diversity and demographic stability of animal populations in AZA-accredited zoos.

Snow leopards are among the world’s most endangered big cats with an estimated 3,500-6,500 remaining in the wild. Their range is limited to remote mountains of Central Asia and parts of China, Mongolia, Russia, India and Bhutan. WCS has worked for decades on snow leopard conservation programs in the field with current projects in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and western China. Past projects have included work with snow leopards in Kyrgyzstan and Mongolia.

The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo - Open every day of the year. General Admission is $12 for adults, $9 for senior citizens, $7 for children 3 to 12, and free for children younger than 3. Total Experience Admission is $18.00 for adults, $15.00 for senior citizens, and $13.00 for children 3 to 12. 4-D theater admission is $4.00 for members and $7.00 for non-members. Zoo hours are 10am to 5:30 pm, April through October, and 10am – 4:30pm daily, November through April. Tickets are sold until one half-hour before closing. The zoo is located at Fifth Avenue and 64th Street. For further information, please call 212-439-6500 or visit www.centralparkzoo.com

The Wildlife Conservation Society saves wildlife and wild places worldwide. We do so through science, global conservation, education and the management of the world’s largest system of urban wildlife parks, led by the flagship Bronx Zoo. Together these activities change attitudes towards nature and help people imagine wildlife and humans living in harmony. WCS is committed to this mission because it is essential to the integrity of life on Earth.

Note to the Media: If you would like to guide your readers or viewers to a Web link where they can make donations in support of helping save wildlife and wild places, please direct them to www.wcs.org.

Max Pulsinelli | Newswise
Further information:
http://www.wcs.org

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