Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sea Turtles FeeBee and Milton to be Released with Satellite Tracking Device

06.10.2008
Two six-year-old Loggerhead turtles, FeeBee and Milton, have grown large enough to be released into the waters of Florida at the end of this month.

To celebrate their release into the wild, a “Goodbye” party will take place on Sunday, October 5, from 1-4 p.m. at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center located at 1801 North Ocean Boulevard, Boca Raton. The event, which is open to the public, will include information about the rearing and care of FeeBee and Milton and satellite tracking that is planned when they are released. Visitors will also have the opportunity to meet the scientists who played integral roles in their lives.

Feebee and Milton were hatched in July 2002 from two separate nests. FeeBee’s nest was washed over by several storms and only 16 of the 94 eggs hatched. FeeBee was the sole survivor of her nest. Milton, on the other hand, was one of 102 eggs which hatched from his nest. Dr. Jeannette Wyneken, associate professor of biological sciences, an expert in conservation and marine biology, and two graduate and six undergraduate students in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science at FAU worked with FeeBee and Milton for a national sea turtle sex-ratio study she was conducting.

“The gender of a sea turtle usually cannot be determined until they are 15-25 years-old,” said Wyneken. “As part of this study, what we were able to develop was a way to identify their sex when they were three-months-old and the information is helping us to address the implications of skewed sex-ratios in sea turtles.”

Knowing sex ratios and how they change over time is critical for the recovery of imperiled species. “Basically, we are identifying the baselines again which future changes in sex-ratios can be identified before they become so skewed that there are problems,” said Wyneken. “It is critical that there are enough males and females to allow for successful breeding.”

Since the day they hatched, FeeBee and Milton have called Gumbo Limbo home, first at the FAU marine lab. At three months of age, they moved just 50 feet away from the lab and have since spent quality time with Dr. Kirt Rusenko, the marine conservationist at the Center.

“These turtles have meant so much to us and to the community,” said Rusenko. “We will be monitoring them closely for the next year by using satellite tags to learn more about their behavior and movements.” Rosenko has been working closely with Dr. Katherine Mansfeld from the University of Miami who has extensive experience with satellite tagged sea turtles.

The satellite tracking maps for FeeBee and Milton will be available to everyone on the Web at http://www.seaturtle.org and http://www.gumbolimbo.org.

For more information about the “Goodbye” party for FeeBee and Milton, call 561-338-1582 or visit http://www.gumbolimbo.org.

Florida Atlantic University opened its doors in 1964 as the fifth public university in Florida. Today, the University serves more than 26,000 undergraduate and graduate students on seven campuses strategically located along 150 miles of Florida's southeastern coastline. Building on its rich tradition as a teaching university, with a world-class faculty, FAU hosts ten colleges: College of Architecture, Urban & Public Affairs, Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts & Letters, the Charles E. Schmidt College of Biomedical Science, the Barry Kaye College of Business, the College of Education, the College of Engineering & Computer Science, the Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College, the Graduate College, the Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing and the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science.

Gisele Galoustian | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.gumbolimbo.org
http://www.seaturtle.org
http://www.fau.edu

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

nachricht A new indicator for marine ecosystem changes: the diatom/dinoflagellate index
21.08.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular Force Sensors

20.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Producing electricity during flight

20.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

20.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>