Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Refugia of the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest could be the basis for its regeneration

06.09.2007
During the last glaciation, which ended about 10 000 years Before Present (BP), the Brazilian Atlantic forest extended over all the eastern side of the country, covering more than 1 200 000 km², 15% of Brazil’s territory.

Now only 95 000 km² of this natural habitat survives, just 8% of its initial extent. It is still a large biodiversity reservoir in Brazil, second only to the Amazonian forest.

On one hectare of Atlantic forest the biologists recorded over 450 different tree species. But deforestation and intensive farming methods make this tropical forest one of Earth’s most seriously threatened ecosystems. In the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais, regions where agriculture has developed strongly in recent years, the forest is largely fragmented, represented only as small blocks situated on the abrupt slopes which plunge down towards the Atlantic.

With the objective of analysing the changes that have taken place in this ecosystem over the Quaternary era, IRD researchers and counterparts from the University of São Paulo put together the results from three scientific disciplines (botany, palynology, genetics) applied to three species of the tree genus Podocarpus: P. sellowii, P. lambertii and P. brasiliensis. These tropical trees belong to the conifer family. They are good indicators of geographical evolution of the Atlantic forest with time, seeing that the Brazilian species are endemic to this natural habitat. Moreover, pollen grains from the genus Podocarpus have a typical small bladder-like morphology and stay intact for a long time in sediments. These two characteristics make them good candidates for palynological studies.

The team recorded and then collected available plant material from different sites where Atlantic forest stands are still present. This involved 26 sampling points spread over a rectangle 4000 km long by 500 km wide corresponding to the whole of the area of distribution of this ecosystem. They corresponded to 26 different populations of Podocarpus.

This first investigation stage allowed subsequent accurate genetic characterization of each population. In parallel, six sedimentary cores were taken at different latitudes where Atlantic forest still grows so that analysis could be made of the frequency of pollen grains belonging to the Podocarpus genus contained in the various samples collected. The borehole sunk at Colônia (see Map) in the state of São Paulo yielded a core showing that the frequency of these pollen grains fluctuated with time; the phases of expansion and regression of this taxon (3) succeeded one another for periods of varying length. Evidence for a rise in frequency of Podocarpus pollen grains was found for periods of between 60 000 and 45 000 years BP, then between 29 000 and 21 000 years BP in the south of Brazil and between 16 000 and 15 000 years BP in the Nordeste region. These fluctuating rises which occurred during times of glaciation would correspond to phases of expansion of the Atlantic forest in these regions.

In order to test this hypothesis, the Franco-Brazilian team used techniques from molecular biology. For each of the 26 pre-selected populations, the researchers collected leaves of five individual trees of the Podocarpus genus from which they extracted DNA. Nucleotide sequence amplification was performed, then phylogenetic analysis. Comparison was made between that analysis and the level of genetic differentiation between each population of Podocarpus. The scientists thus succeeded in delimiting three large centres of original colonization distributed according to latitude.

The multidisciplinary approach also showed that the expansion of tropical conifer populations never occurred during interglacial periods, in contrast to what usually happened in our temperate latitudes. In the tropics, the populations of Podocarpus that make up the Atlantic forest in fact gained ground in glacial periods owing to an increase in humidity and a cooling of temperatures. At present, in the Nordeste region where a more arid climate prevails, this humid tropical forest occurs in the form of small isolated populations. Nevertheless, it has not always been like that. In that part of the country, the study confirmed the notion that a dense rainforest developed at 15 000 years BP. In the space of about 10 years, its extremely rapid expansion, over an area twice the size of France, was made possible only by the presence of a mosaic of a multitude of patches of forest, now dispersed sparsely over this arid terrain.

Predictions for climate changes for the next few decades envisage an increase in the duration and intensity of periods of drought in the intertropical regions, as in Nordeste. If this trend persists, the protection of such surviving areas of Brazil’s Atlantic forest, these refugia, will become essential for the conservation of this ecosystem

Gregory Flechet - IRD

Grégory Fléchet | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ird.fr/fr/actualites/fiches/2007/fas273.pdf

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht A new indicator for marine ecosystem changes: the diatom/dinoflagellate index
21.08.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde

nachricht Value from wastewater
16.08.2017 | Hochschule Landshut

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Treating arthritis with algae

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Witnessing turbulent motion in the atmosphere of a distant star

23.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>