Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Climate Adaptation Faces Growing Threats

04.04.2007
Adaptation planning must anticipate additional impacts caused by interacting changes outlined in IPCC WG2

“Humankind’s long history of coping with climate tells us that the limits of adaptation are real, and cannot be reduced to economic trade-offs with investment or even with mitigation" say Kirstin Dow and Tom Downing, authors of The Atlas of Climate Change. “The challenges of adapting to new conditions are substantial and require much more effort. We still need focused guidance on where urgent adaptation is required now, where adaptation is likely to fail over the longer time frame and how to cope with the potential for crises."

Says Downing – also a lead author on linkages between adaptation and mitigation of the Working Group II of the IPCC Report released this week – “Climate change changes everything, from environmental services to economic infrastructure and even our culture.”

The IPCC WG2 has pulled together an amazing number of documented case studies where climate change is already causing effects, on the physiology of species, in changes in distributions and functions of ecosystems and to a lesser extent in managed resources.

But, warn Dow and Downing, “Climate change impacts accumulate through its many affects, accelerating multiple stresses that will concern all societies and economies, from the wealthy fabric of post- industrialized countries to those with severely limited resources focused on poverty and vulnerability reduction.”

For example, the rural economy in temperate countries may decline as water becomes scarce, heat waves stifle outdoor activities, and attractive environmental areas are degraded. In Africa, drought may reach a crisis against long term loss of reliable water supplies, accelerated soil erosion and deforestation, leaving some populations with little recourse other than leaving their homes.

Say Dow and Downing, “As you look at the IPCC Report, look at all of the elements that are changing because of climate change and think about how people, places, and economies are linked together in today’s world. On its own, each impact may not appear too bad, at least for the next few years. But are our societies ready to cope with all of the changes occurring and interacting at once? And, add up over the next few decades?

Says Downing “The Atlas of Climate Change brings the central story of climate change, reflecting the robust findings of the IPCC, to a wider audience. It is a resource for policy makers, scientists and the public, to raise awareness of the full story of climate change, from the scientific evidence, understanding of consequences to the nature of causes and responses. Issues of multiple stresses, vulnerability, and adaptation are a central theme running through the discussions of potential consequences and responses.”

Foreign language editions have been sold in Brazil, Germany, Italy, Japan, South Korea and Portugal with Greek and Spanish rights under offer.

Reviews and awards for The Atlas of Climate Change:
http://shop.earthscan.co.uk/ProductDetails/mcs/productID/738/groupID/4/categoryID/6/

Gudrun Freese | alfa
Further information:
http://shop.earthscan.co.uk/ProductDetails/mcs/productID/738
http://shop.earthscan.co.uk/ProductDetails/mcs/productID/738/groupID/4/categoryID/6/

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Value from wastewater
16.08.2017 | Hochschule Landshut

nachricht Species Richness – a false friend? Scientists want to improve biodiversity assessments
01.08.2017 | Carl von Ossietzky-Universität Oldenburg

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>