Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Protecting Natural Spaces Does Not Prevent Invasion by Foreign Species

28.02.2002


A study carried out by researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelonashows that protecting natural spaces does not prevent invasion by foreign vegetation species. Montserrat Vilà and Jordi Pujadas, researchers at the CREAF, have published the study, the first to quantify the relationship between species invasions and human activity on a regional scale, in Biological Conservation.



The introduction of foreign species is a global phenomenon which has negative effects on the conservation of native species and the integrity of ecosystems, having significant economic consequences. Invasion by these species is mainly due to human activity - agricultural work, gardening, and the movement of people or commerce in general, but this relationship had yet to be quantified by a study.

A team of researchers co-ordinated by Montserrat Vilà from the Ecological Research and Forestry Applications Centre (a university institute attached to the Autonomous University of Barcelona) has quantified the relationships between invasions by foreign species and human activity for the first time. The researchers analysed land use and various socio-economic parameters in regions in Europe and North Africa, in order to explore the opportunity to predict the abundance of alien plants based on these parameters.


Of all the variables considered for evaluating human activity in the study, the most significant in terms of the effect on foreign species density are the Human Development Index (a United Nations estimation of the quality of life in a region, depending on life expectancy and literacy) and the region’s volume of imported goods. The researchers also observed that of the factors related to land use, the kilometres of road built in an area is directly correlated with the density of foreign species.

This research, published in Biological Conservation, has provided an unexpected item of data - protecting natural spaces does not prevent invasion by foreign species. The authors point out that this is possibly due to an increase in the number of visitors to these protected areas, as well as to the impact of economic activities resulting from the protection of natural spaces, such as gardening activities in hotels and tourist complexes situated near these areas.

In order to solve the problem of invasion by foreign species, the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona researchers, in their research article, recommend “avoiding the use of alien plant species in restoration programmes, encouraging the use of native species in gardening, identifying invasion corridors in protected areas and improving monitoring protocols in order to detect grasses of non-native species in grain imports”. The scientists call for “more research into the ecology of invading species as well as research into invasion by animals and pathogenic organisms”, and point out that this field of research “provides an excellent framework for interdisciplinary research, with co-operation by ecologists, geographers, economists and land use managers”.

Octavi López Coronado | alphagalileo

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Value from wastewater
16.08.2017 | Hochschule Landshut

nachricht Species Richness – a false friend? Scientists want to improve biodiversity assessments
01.08.2017 | Carl von Ossietzky-Universität Oldenburg

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>