Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Arsenic in drinking water can lead to miscarriages and sudden infant death

15.03.2007
For the first time, researchers have been able to show that mothers who drink water containing arsenic run an increased risk of having a miscarriage or losing their child in its first year. This has been demonstrated by a research team from Sweden and Bangladesh in an article published last Saturday in the Net edition of American Journal of Epidemiology.

Arsenic has a number of known serious health effects, including increased cancer risk, higher frequency of cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Until now, it has not been possible to show any impact on fetuses and newborns, even though a few studies have suggested such consequences. A number of countries, especially poor ones, have high concentrations of arsenic in their well water. In Bangladesh, sediment containing arsenic has been carried with rivers for millennia, creating health risks for nearly half of the population.

In the current study, Anisur Rahman from ICDDRB (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Research) in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and a doctoral candidate at the Unit for International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH) at Uppsala University, Sweden, has shown that mothers who drink this arsenic-tainted water run an increased risk of having a miscarriage or losing their child in its first year.

This is the first time statistically significant effects have been shown. They were apparent even at relatively low levels of concentration of arsenic, 50 micrograms/liter. The findings are based on more than 29,000 pregnancies and were gathered in Matlab, Bangladesh, in a collaborative effort involving ICDDRB, Uppsala University, and the Karolinska Institute.

“The study shows how important it is for the population to get arsenic-free water as soon as possible, and that pregnant women must be given priority in this work,” says Lars-Åke Persson, professor of international child health at Uppsala University.

Anneli Waara | alfa
Further information:
http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/kwm025v1

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Successful calculation of human and natural influence on cloud formation
04.11.2016 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

nachricht Invasive Insects Cost the World Billions Per Year
04.10.2016 | University of Adelaide

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

IHP presents the fastest silicon-based transistor in the world

05.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

InLight study: insights into chemical processes using light

05.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

High-precision magnetic field sensing

05.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>