Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New University research institute to produce clean energy technologies for a greener future

28.11.2006
A new research institute being launched at The University of Nottingham is to bring together academics and industrial partners nationally and internationally to develop cutting–edge energy technologies that are both sustainable and affordable.

The Energy Technologies Research Institute will feature a multidisciplinary team of more than 100 engineers and physical and social scientists working on research projects totalling more than £8 million. The academics will work in collaboration with a range of industrial partners in the energy sector, including E.ON and Rolls Royce on projects funded by the UK research councils, the Department of Trade and Industry and the European Union.

Professor Colin Snape, director of the new institute, said: “Under the looming threat of global climate change and our hunger for cost-effective and environmentally-friendly energy, new clean fossil technologies linked to carbon capture and storage, hydrogen fuel cells and natural sources of power such as solar and wind energy will all play a vital role in changing the way in which we use energy worldwide.”

The new institute will focus on six broad themes:

Clean fossil fuels and carbon abatement technologies including research into cleaner coal technology, carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage, together with light-harvesting, which is the use of light energy for photochemical conversion of CO2 into fuels or chemicals. The internationally-renowned research on coal science includes new adsorbents for CO capture and for toxic trace metals, such as mercury.

Hydrogen and fuel cells including research into hydrogen generation, storage and power generation by fuel cells and for use in powering vehicles. A highlight of the research programme is the world-leading effort on new materials to store hydrogen in high capacities.

Renewable energy production — will include research into renewable energies aimed at reducing pollution such as solar and wind energy and forestry and agriculture crops such as sugar beet, wheat, barley and oilseed rape which can either be used directly to produce energy ie. through burning for heat, or converted into electricity, biogas, biodiesel or bioethanol.

Infrastructure technologies for green energy encompassing research to develop new facilities, equipment and systems for delivering and distributing energy such as electricity created from renewable sources.

Energy efficient technology in the built environment covers a wide range of new technologies that will make use of renewable energies in buildings. This will include efficient energy technologies to provide heating, ventilation and air conditioning of buildings and hot water supply. This activity is centred on the School of the Built Environment, which has established unique research facilities including the David Wilson Millennium Eco-house, Sustainable Research Building, Environmental Centre for Architecture and Marmont Renewable Energy Centre.

Environmental impact, economic and social aspects includes research into the environmental risks of new technologies, understanding the geography and sociology of the energy market, for example, research into the restructuring of the coal industry in the Ukraine, and public understanding and acceptance of new developments in energy technologies.

The new Energy Technologies Research Institute will be officially launched by the Acting Vice-Chancellor of The University of Nottingham, Professor David Greenaway, at a special event being held in the Exchange Building on Jubilee Campus from 5.30pm on Wednesday November 29.

The event will feature an inaugural lecture by newly-appointed special professor Allan Jones, Head of Research and Development at energy company E.ON, on the topic Successes in Coal Research and Development for Power Generation and the Challenges of a Low Carbon Future.

Professor Jones said: “As we face the challenge of climate change we need to develop today cleaner energy technologies for tomorrow and that's something that not only drives me every day, it also drives E.ON.

“We're committed to both reducing the carbon intensity of our own operations and to helping find new ways for the UK and the world to reduce carbon. Our work with the University will help to strengthen that work and, by using the brightest minds wherever we can, together we can help plan for a low carbon future.”

Emma Thorne | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht How fires are changing the tundra’s face
12.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

nachricht Using drones to estimate crop damage by wild boars
12.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

12.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents

12.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

12.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>