Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Atmosphere and Oceans Finely Balanced

24.01.2002


The atmosphere and oceans exist in a delicate state of balance according to research co-ordinated by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and published this month by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).



The recently completed five year research programme of Atmospheric Chemistry Studies in the Oceanic Environment (ACSOE) concludes that atmospheric pollution travels much further than previously thought and that this has important consequences for global chemistry and climate.

"The programme found that atmospheric chemicals interact with the ocean web of life in a profound way, such as gases being emitted that help regulate atmospheric conditions and the supply of essential elements such as selenium transported from the oceans to the land," said Dr Bill Sturges of UEA’s School of Environmental Sciences, the research programme’s Project Manager.


Chemical processes associated with cloud formation and distribution were found to be much more affected by pollution than previously thought and these findings will be important in ensuring that global climate models are as up to date and accurate as possible.

One of the projects carried out as part of the ACSOE programme investigated how trace metals are carried off the European continent by south-easterly winds and are deposited in the north-east Atlantic Ocean.

"Even though the predominant airflow over the north-east Atlantic is relatively clean and westerly, when south-easterly wind does occur it brings with it significant amounts of manmade trace metal pollution - manganese, lead and zinc - which has been picked up over Europe’s heavily populated and industrial regions," said Dr Lucinda Spokes of UEA’s School of Environmental Sciences.

"These pollutants, which travel hundreds of miles, have an important impact on the marine plant life when they are deposited in the ocean. Some act as nutrients for marine plants known as phytoplankton, while others are highly toxic to them."

The ACSOE programme carried out research in three main areas:
  • air-sea exchange, for example gases produced by marine microorganisms;
  • the chemistry responsible for ‘cleansing’ the lower atmosphere of pollutants; and
  • development of clouds and fine airborne particles, or aerosols, in European air during transport over the Atlantic Ocean.


Further research is needed to improve scientific understanding of the intricate relationships between air quality, ocean productivity, climate and indeed human health.

The complete programme findings and conclusions are published this month in ACSOE: Achievements and Scientific Highlights.

Mary Pallister | alphagalileo
Further information:
http://www.badc.rl.ac.uk/data/acsoe

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Litter is present throughout the world’s oceans: 1,220 species affected
27.03.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

nachricht International network connects experimental research in European waters
21.03.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei (IGB)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphere

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>