Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New project to help solve problems of UK water shortage

26.07.2006
Businesses and landowners will benefit from a new £1.5 million project at the University of Liverpool which aims to alleviate the effects of pollution and low rainfall on water supplies in South East England.

Water resources in the region are subject to acute pressures due to high population density and low rainfall. It is also forecast that the South East is the region most likely to be affected by climate change.

A three-year project, funded by the EU LIFE-Environment programme, will offer free advice and management plans to landowners, businesses and local authorities on how to address issues such as pesticide use, erosion and more efficient water management in preventing continued damage to the water environment.

The South East is the second largest regional economy in the UK after London. The high level of economic activity and employment has attracted workers to the region, leading to an increase in population and high demands for water supply to homes and businesses.

Professor Ed Maltby, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Water, Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER), said: “The South East has low rainfall relative to other UK regions and less available water per capita than drought-stricken Sudan. Hotter summers will mean even lower river flows and higher demand for garden watering and irrigation, leading to inevitable restrictions by the water providers.

“This new project tackles problems of low water supply by employing the Ecosystem Approach, a methodology to aid decision making which will help achieve sustainable use and conservation of water-dependent natural resources. Our project advisors will work closely with stakeholders to help reduce pollution and advise on strategies for the more efficient use of water. Without these methods in place the cost of water will continue to rise; permanent hosepipe bans may be put in place and stretches of river will dry up, destroying wildlife habitats.”

At the conclusion of the project the team hope to see increased awareness in sustainable water use, improved water quality and provision of habitats in restored wetlands.

Joanna Robotham | alfa
Further information:
http://www.liv.ac.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Safeguarding sustainability through forest certification mapping
27.06.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Dune ecosystem modelling
26.06.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion

24.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

ADIR Project: Lasers Recover Valuable Materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>