Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Aston University tackles changing landfill pile

02.05.2006


Aston University’s Bio-Energy Research Group (BERG) and Biffa, one of the UK’s largest waste companies, have teamed up to find new ways to recover energy from a changing mix of domestic, commercial and industrial landfill waste.



The Government’s pledge to cut the amount of biodegradable waste going to landfill by 50% from 1995 levels by 2013 means UK landfill operators face a very different pile of rubbish than in the past.

Biffa operates over 30 landfill sites across the UK. Most of these sites recover landfill gas with more than 50% methane to power reciprocating engines that generate electricity for the national grid.


But with increasing amounts of biodegradable waste being diverted, the landfill mix is changing. The diminishing organic and moisture content of the waste, coupled with tighter regulations for new landfill sites, mean lower rates of waste decay and a decline in landfill gas production.

Converting the remaining fraction of organic waste into energy onsite is challenging but essential if the Government is going to meet its target to recover 67% of Britain’s waste by 2015.

An innovative conversion method called pyrolysis could provide the answer. Under one of three national CASE studentships awarded by the Mini-Waste Faraday Partnership, Biffa has teamed up with BERG, a leading research group at Aston University focusing on pyrolysis technology, to investigate converting the organic fraction of various waste streams into a gaseous or liquid fuel to power the existing engines.

Pyrolysis heats up biomass to high temperatures in the absence of oxygen. The technology can convert organic waste into gases or liquids for fuel after separating out valuable metals and other products, which can then be reused in building and construction materials.

BERG will characterise different waste streams, test them in its pyrolysis reactors and evaluate their potential to be used on landfill sites.

“Pyrolysis is a technology with promise. It offers an innovative way to recover energy from waste and reduce our dependence on fossil fuels” said Stamatios Dacey, the BERG PhD student who was awarded the CASE studentship.

Crystal Luxmore | alfa
Further information:
http://www.aston-berg.co.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Listening in: Acoustic monitoring devices detect illegal hunting and logging
14.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

nachricht How fires are changing the tundra’s face
12.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Error-free into the Quantum Computer Age

A study carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum error correction protocols that detect and correct processing errors.

In order to reach their full potential, today’s quantum computer prototypes have to meet specific criteria: First, they have to be made bigger, which means...

Im Focus: Search for planets with Carmenes successful

German and Spanish researchers plan, build and use modern spectrograph

Since 2016, German and Spanish researchers, among them scientists from the University of Göttingen, have been hunting for exoplanets with the “Carmenes”...

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Single-photon detector can count to 4

18.12.2017 | Information Technology

Quantum memory with record-breaking capacity based on laser-cooled atoms

18.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

How much soil goes down the drain -- New data on soil lost due to water

18.12.2017 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>