Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Keele group develop new technology in concrete evaluation

24.03.2006


A team from the Institute for the Environment, Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics at Keele University has developed a technique to identify corroded steel within concrete by non-destructive means.



Reinforced concrete can suffer dangerous and potentially catastrophic deterioration when the reinforcing steel becomes corroded, making regular assessment critical. Commercial techniques currently available involve invasive procedures including damaging the concrete or provide indirect evidence of corrosion.

The new hybrid technology developed by the Keele team has the potential to replace these invasive and less conclusive methods. The concrete survey and repair industries are already showing considerable interest.


The amount of civil infrastructure in Europe using reinforced concrete, e.g. motorways, car parks and large buildings, creates a potential market of approximately £100 million. An even larger market is available if heritage buildings are included as often only non-destructive testing methods are permitted.

The Keele team, led by Professor Peter Haycock, is working in collaboration with Dr Steve Hoon from Manchester Metropolitan University. The programme also involves Concrete Repairs Ltd, engineering consultancy Faber Maunsell Ltd, Oxfordshire County Council, Network Rail, Danish manufacturer Cathodic Protection International ApS and the Netherlands Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water.

The project has already attracted significant commercial interest and a new company, SciSite Limited, has been formed. SciSite has been spun out from the university, to exploit this innovative technology and provide a much needed solution for the industry. This has attracted funding from a range of West Midlands sources (the Enterprise Fellowship Scheme, Spinner and Different by Design) and is currently undertaking its first commercial work around the UK.

The University based group includes of Drs Peter Grannell, Matthew Hocking, Nigel Cassidy and Anthony Wright, together with research student Laurence North. Drs Haycock and Hocking are the Directors of SciSite Limited and the team have a wealth of knowledge in the fields of material science and environmental research.

Chris Stone | alfa
Further information:
http://www.keele.ac.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Bioinvasion on the rise
15.02.2017 | Universität Konstanz

nachricht Litter Levels in the Depths of the Arctic are On the Rise
10.02.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>