Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Keele group develop new technology in concrete evaluation

24.03.2006


A team from the Institute for the Environment, Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics at Keele University has developed a technique to identify corroded steel within concrete by non-destructive means.



Reinforced concrete can suffer dangerous and potentially catastrophic deterioration when the reinforcing steel becomes corroded, making regular assessment critical. Commercial techniques currently available involve invasive procedures including damaging the concrete or provide indirect evidence of corrosion.

The new hybrid technology developed by the Keele team has the potential to replace these invasive and less conclusive methods. The concrete survey and repair industries are already showing considerable interest.


The amount of civil infrastructure in Europe using reinforced concrete, e.g. motorways, car parks and large buildings, creates a potential market of approximately £100 million. An even larger market is available if heritage buildings are included as often only non-destructive testing methods are permitted.

The Keele team, led by Professor Peter Haycock, is working in collaboration with Dr Steve Hoon from Manchester Metropolitan University. The programme also involves Concrete Repairs Ltd, engineering consultancy Faber Maunsell Ltd, Oxfordshire County Council, Network Rail, Danish manufacturer Cathodic Protection International ApS and the Netherlands Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water.

The project has already attracted significant commercial interest and a new company, SciSite Limited, has been formed. SciSite has been spun out from the university, to exploit this innovative technology and provide a much needed solution for the industry. This has attracted funding from a range of West Midlands sources (the Enterprise Fellowship Scheme, Spinner and Different by Design) and is currently undertaking its first commercial work around the UK.

The University based group includes of Drs Peter Grannell, Matthew Hocking, Nigel Cassidy and Anthony Wright, together with research student Laurence North. Drs Haycock and Hocking are the Directors of SciSite Limited and the team have a wealth of knowledge in the fields of material science and environmental research.

Chris Stone | alfa
Further information:
http://www.keele.ac.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds – Just a Myth?
19.02.2018 | Universität Basel

nachricht Removing fossil fuel subsidies will not reduce CO2 emissions as much as hoped
08.02.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists re-create brain neurons to study obesity and personalize treatment

20.04.2018 | Health and Medicine

Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

20.04.2018 | Materials Sciences

Clear as mud: Desiccation cracks help reveal the shape of water on Mars

20.04.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>