Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Staying on top of the world

21.03.2006


Project E! 2408 on Arctic Tourism had the ambitious target of mapping the effects tourism has already had on Arctic areas and pointing the way to tourism development without threatening the delicate ecosystem. Four widely differing locations within the Nordic Arctic region showed traditional reliance on just a few economic activities, making them vulnerable to unemployment. Project results demonstrate that tourism can offer a new source of local jobs in the Arctic region, provided it is developed with regard to sustainable use of resources, including the environment and wildlife.



This EUREKA project, involving collaboration from Denmark, Iceland and Norway, focused heavily on influencing the progress of tourism to ensure socioeconomic benefits to the local people involved. As well as financing, project leaders took inspiration and access to very varied viewpoints through being part of the EUREKA Network. Although the four areas had significant differences, the experience gained led to the development of common guidelines for managing the delicate balance between sustaining the economy, the culture and the Arctic environment. Important lessons emerged from the work, despite some initial reluctance to adopt a new approach. It became clear that tourism can offer a new source of local jobs in the Arctic region, provided it is developed with regard to sustainable use of resources, including the environment and wildlife. This should reduce the dependency of the traditional society on the few other sources of income. At the same time, generating tourism involves co-operation between many different types and levels of stakeholders, at both the local and national level.

The project, coordinated by Kåre Hendriksen, at the time a consultant for the Danish project coordinator Ramboll, set out to plan the rehabilitation of damaged areas (at two locations in Greenland, plus one each in Iceland and Norway). Now new initiatives are helping encourage eco-friendly visitors, generate new local jobs and revive pride in traditional culture and occupations. Stig Hirsbak from Ramboll explains: “The project was trying to encourage people not only to prevent degeneration of the environment, but to recover from damage already done, and also to create some revenue”. And all on a budget of €0.86 million. Hirsbak continues, “It’s easy to talk about sustainability at the desk level, but much harder to make it work.” The key is preventing further damage, otherwise increased tourism would only be short-lived.

Catherine Shiels | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Safeguarding sustainability through forest certification mapping
27.06.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Dune ecosystem modelling
26.06.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>