Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Record Bonefish

28.02.2006


The record-setting bonefish traveled across the Gulf Stream to be recaptured 321 days after tagging and 186 miles from where it was first sighted.


Tagging program records ‘longest movement’ — Double previous distance

While a bonefish catch is always gratifying for the avid angler, one caught in the Bahamian flats off southwestern Andros Island in December proved even more satisfying for the researchers who study bonefish migration at Bonefish and Tarpon Unlimited (BTU) and the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. The fish was a record catch, representing the longest movement by a bonefish and measured at more than double the previous distance record.

The record-setting bonefish traveled across the Gulf Stream to be recaptured 321 days after tagging and 186 miles from where it was first sighted.



Since 1998, the Bonefish-Tarpon Conservation Research Program at the UM Rosenstiel School, which is funded by Bonefish and Tarpon Unlimited, has tagged more than 4,000 bonefish throughout the Florida Keys to better understand bonefish behavior and migration patterns. As fishermen discover the tags on the fish they catch, they are instructed to measure and release the fish, note their whereabouts, and notify the program of the recapture via the phone number provided.

This was the case on Dec. 29, when Dr. Brian Harris, a dermatologist from Fort Myers, Fla., caught one of these tagged fish – estimated at 28.5 inches – while he was vacationing in the Bahamas.

“The tag number revealed that this bonefish was originally tagged at Bear Cut near Key Biscayne on Feb. 11, 2005, by Capt. Joe Gonzalez,” said Dr. Jerry Ault, associate professor of marine biology and fisheries at the UM Rosenstiel School. “That means the fish was at liberty 321 days, gaining about an inch in length and moving in a linear distance of 186 miles.”

This distance record is more than double the previous one of 75 miles (Key Largo to Big Pine Key). It also suggests that bonefish can migrate across the Gulf Stream and perhaps mix with the Bahamas bonefish population.

“More research will be needed to see if this was an isolated phenomenon or a newly discovered behavioral pattern,” Ault said, adding that the prospect of bonefish crossing the Gulf Stream has profound implications on the population’s prospects and is an exciting breakthrough.

This is the reason why BTU invested in this kind of research to begin with,” said Tom Davidson Sr., BTU chairman and founding member. “It’s quite rewarding to uncover new information like this that bonefish may be crossing the Gulfstream. It’s what truly can lead to better understanding and managing of our fisheries."

This research is made possible through assistance from the Florida Keys Fishing Guides Association and support from BTU, a South Florida-based nonprofit organization composed of sport fishermen and marine researchers with a worldwide mission of working together to learn how to best enhance their namesake species.

In addition to being good indicators of an ecosystem’s health, bonefish are a valuable asset to South Florida for another reason. They bring in a significant amount of tourism. Bonefish sport fishing contributes approximately $1.0 billion annually to the Florida economy, making sport fishing more valuable than commercial fishing in today’s market.

Rosenstiel School is part of the University of Miami and, since its founding in the 1940s, has grown into one of the world’s premier marine and atmospheric research institutions.

Ivy F. Kupec | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.bonefishresearch.com
http://www.tarbone.org
http://www.rsmas.miami.edu

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht How does the loss of species alter ecosystems?
18.05.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Excess diesel emissions bring global health & environmental impacts
16.05.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>