Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New cleaning technology for produced water

15.12.2005


When oil is produced, water accounts for about 60 per cent of the pumped volume. Today, a high percentage of this briny water is polluted. In response to the authorities’ target of pollution-free produced water, a new cleaning technology will be developed over the next three years.



Water volumes are increasing, and purification requirements are becoming far more stringent. In response, we are making broad-based efforts to develop a whole new technology, comments the project manager, Professor Johan Sjöblom of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim.

Headed by NTNU, the research project will be based on broad cooperation between several oil companies and research groups.


On the Norwegian Continental Shelf, water accounts for about 60 per cent of the pumped volume, and the water content is rising as the oil fields age.

In 2003, 135 million cubic metres of produced water were discharged on the Norwegian Shelf. The Norwegian authorities’ goal is to ensure that this produced water is completely free of pollutants when discharged. This goal has not been reached as yet, and polluted produced water is currently either discharged into the sea or reinjected into the oil reservoirs. It is hoped that the new research project will provide a solution to the purification problems.

To develop a new, smoothly-functioning cleaning technology for produced water, NTNU has gathered talented people from a number of research communities and fields.

The special thing about this project is that we are addressing the issue from several different angles. For example, we have linked together two departments at NTNU that have long experience of purifying municipal and industrial waste water, and a group that has considerable experience with emulsions and the separation of oil and water for the petroleum industry. In addition, the oil industry and the supply industry are part of the team. You might say that we are throwing all the ammunition we have at eliminating the problem of polluted produced water, concludes Professor Johan Sjöblom.

The project is scheduled to run until 2008.

Thomas Evensen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.forskningsradet.no/servlet/ContentServer?cid=1088801789674&pagename=petromaks%2FPage%2FHovedSideEng

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

nachricht A new indicator for marine ecosystem changes: the diatom/dinoflagellate index
21.08.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

Im Focus: Artificial Enzymes for Hydrogen Conversion

Scientists from the MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion report in the first issue of the new journal JOULE.

Cell Press has just released the first issue of Joule, a new journal dedicated to sustainable energy research. In this issue James Birrell, Olaf Rüdiger,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

IVAM’s LaserForum visits the Swiss canton of St. Gallen with the topic ultrashort pulse lasers

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

The Wadden Sea and the Elbe Studied with Zeppelin, Drones and Research Ships

19.09.2017 | Earth Sciences

Digging sensors out of an efficiency hole

19.09.2017 | Materials Sciences

Solar wind impacts on giant 'space hurricanes' may affect satellite safety

19.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>