Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


New climate modelling computer provides more reliable risk analyses


Enhanced computing capability will make it possible to gain new insights on climate change. On Tuesday, August 23, the climate modelling computer Tornado was inaugurated by Lena Sommestad, who is Environment Minister in Sweden.

Current research reports on climatic evolution unanimously concur that global temperature and precipitation are in a state of change. The extent global warming will reach in the future depends largely on the quantity of future carbon dioxide emission, but scientists need to explore several other uncertainty factors. For instance, what regions can be expected to be bear the brunt of climatic change, and just how commonplace will devastating storms, rain torrents and extreme heat waves be in the future.

A powerful new computer is now available for highly detailed climate studies by Swedish research teams at Rossby Centre (a unit of the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, SMHI) and the Department of Meteorology at Stockholm University. This climate modelling computer, designed and hosted by the National Supercomputer Centre at Linköping University, is dedicated to the development of climate scenarios and the assessment of how climate change might influence regional conditions. Especially the Arctic climate and the Baltic Sea will be focal points for study.

Environment Minister Lena Sommestad officially launched the climate modelling computer Tornado on Tuesday August 23 at Linköping University. She stressed the significance of access to upgraded computing power. “Concurrent with our task to reduce greenhouse gases, we must seek knowledge about the effects of climate change, on both global and local levels. This supercomputer can provide us with much needed material for political decision-making.”

A key speaker at the inauguration ceremony was Professor Emeritus Bert Bolin who previously served at Stockholm University. He pointed out, “This expansion of our computing resources will enable Swedish scientists to participate more dynamically in the ongoing European collaboration that is investigating climatic variability. The most significant result of this tool will be more reliable risk analyses of anticipated climatic development.”

Director-General Maria Ågren at the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute emphasized the importance of upgraded computer capacity. “This enhanced computing capability is a giant step forward. Tornado will not only enable more calculations to be made at the same time, but these will be more detailed and cover a greater geographical area. Moreover, we will be better able to understand climate development in now unpredictable areas.

Tornado is funded by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, a Swedish research and educational endowment fund.

Tornado will make previous climate computer resources available. These will continue to be used to develop numerical models and regional scenarios for the scientific community of Scandinavia and the rest of Europe.

Åke Hjelm | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Invasive Insects Cost the World Billions Per Year
04.10.2016 | University of Adelaide

nachricht Malaysia's unique freshwater mussels in danger
27.09.2016 | The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

Im Focus: Ultra-thin ferroelectric material for next-generation electronics

'Ferroelectric' materials can switch between different states of electrical polarization in response to an external electric field. This flexibility means they show promise for many applications, for example in electronic devices and computer memory. Current ferroelectric materials are highly valued for their thermal and chemical stability and rapid electro-mechanical responses, but creating a material that is scalable down to the tiny sizes needed for technologies like silicon-based semiconductors (Si-based CMOS) has proven challenging.

Now, Hiroshi Funakubo and co-workers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, in collaboration with researchers across Japan, have conducted experiments to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia

21.10.2016 | Health and Medicine

Stanford researchers create new special-purpose computer that may someday save us billions

21.10.2016 | Information Technology

From ancient fossils to future cars

21.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>