Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Indian Ocean climate watch network grows

04.04.2005


The development of a huge observing network to monitor ocean currents and temperature and understand the conditions that bring rain - and drought - to nearly two thirds of the world’s population is underway in the Indian Ocean.



The development of a huge observing network to monitor ocean currents and temperature and understand the conditions that bring rain - and drought - to nearly two thirds of the world’s population is underway in the Indian Ocean.

"This is a significant initiative that will be as relevant and important to the wheat farmers of Western Australia as it will be to rice growers in India or Indonesia," says Dr Gary Meyers, from CSIRO’s Wealth from Oceans Flagship.


Nine deep ocean moorings are already in place through investment by the United States, Japan and India, and a further mooring is being considered in a joint arrangement between Australia and China.

One of the architects of a system he and other scientists in the region have been advocating for more than two decades, Dr Meyers hosted the international Indian Ocean Panel at a coordination and planning meeting in Hobart this week involving climate scientists from eight countries.

The Indian Ocean Panel is a permanent body jointly sponsored by the World Climate Research Program’s CLIVAR project on forecasting, and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission’s Global Ocean Observing System.

The climate network shares some common elements with an Indian Ocean basin warning system for tsunami and other marine hazards such as tropical cyclones and storm surge, all three natural events that have in the past caused great damage to the peoples living on the rim of the Indian Ocean.

Dr Meyers said the recent discovery of El Nino-like phenomena in the Indian Ocean--strong two-way interactions between ocean and atmosphere--has highlighted the importance of regional data collection to understand and predict seasonal and longer-term climate variability over all the surrounding continents. Among these are

  • the Indian Ocean Dipole, a fluctuation of surface temperature and currents that brings drought to Indonesia and heavy rain to semiarid regions of Africa. The Dipole is simultaneously related to deficit of rainfall as far away as southeastern Australia.
  • the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO)--a weather pattern that evolves for as long as four weeks and that interacts strongly with the surface layer of the ocean. It originates over the Indian Ocean and impacts on Asian and Australian rainfalls, west coast U.S. weather, tropical Atlantic hurricane formation, and occasionally affects the evolution of the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO).
  • the Indian Ocean has warmed rapidly in the last 30 years and its effects have been tracked to the North Atlantic Oscillation and Sahel rainfall. But scientists do not yet know how it has affected Australian climate.

Dr Meyers said Australian science has considerable experience in ocean monitoring through its present involvement in international research programs.

It has initiated a regional ocean watch system using commercial shipping to monitor subsurface ocean temperature, built a network of tide gauges in the Pacific, and piloted the Argo ocean profiling program between in the eastern Indian and Southern Oceans. Since last December, deployed $1 million worth of moored instruments in the Indonesian archipelago in a five-nation project monitoring the system of ocean currents draining the Pacific into the Indian Ocean.

"Elements of a basin-wide observing network are already in place and generating valuable ocean data. Through satellites, US and Japanese scientists are obtaining information from some of the moorings within 24 hours of recordings, and making the data available to climate modelling and prediction centres around the world.

"Our intention is to build on this foundation and expand it to improve our understanding of temperature structure and currents across the North and South Indian Oceans," he said.

In the mid-1980’s an array of instruments was deployed in the tropical Pacific Ocean with the intent of detecting the onset of El Nino-La Nina events and by the mid-1990’s it was providing valuable advance notice to climatologists and Governments of potentially wet or dry seasons ahead.

CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology are leading Australia’s planning and coordination of the Indian Ocean observing network.

Craig Macaulay | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.csiro.au

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Value from wastewater
16.08.2017 | Hochschule Landshut

nachricht Species Richness – a false friend? Scientists want to improve biodiversity assessments
01.08.2017 | Carl von Ossietzky-Universität Oldenburg

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>