Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Filter That Makes Viruses Adhere

29.03.2005


Siberian researchers have developed a biologically active sorbent of a new generation. The sorbent provides for the 100-percent efficient water purification from microorganisms and bacteriophages. Microbiological researches were performed with partial support of the U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) grant.



Specialists of the Tomsk Polytechnical University and Scientific Research Institute “Microorganism Culture Collection” (VECTOR State Research Center for Virology and Biotechnology) have developed a biologically active sorbent of a new generation based on cotton pulp, modified 1-percent silica slip containing activated alumina. The sorbent provides for the 100-percent efficient water purification from microorganisms and bacteriophages, it can be applied in a wide range of conditions and possesses sufficient durability and longevity.

Water and aqueous solutions are overfilled with pathogens, viruses and toxins, which so far threaten life and health of people, regardless of undertaken actions. Water purification via filtering is ineffective and underproductive, as fine filters with low throughput capacity have to be utilized. Contemporary purification methods are based on the fact that the majority of bacteria and viruses are negatively charged, therefore they can be captured by a macroporous material possessing positive electrokinetic potential. As a result of the process called electrokinetic capturing, small particles would simply stick to filter material.


Since the 70s of the last centur, researchers of different countries have developed several kinds of cation sorbents. Cuno company set up flow-production of a filter material based on diatomite soil under the “Zeta Plus” trade mark. Other foreign sorbents consist of inorganic and organic fiber, the surface of which is covered with needle-shaped boehmite (aluminium hydroxide) nanoparticles.

Filter materials developed by the Russian researchers also contain aluminium oxide and they were created with application of nanotechnology. Unfortunately, all these sorbents are rather expensive and fragile, they can be used only in neutral and acid medium. Therefore, Siberian microbiologists took up to develop more durable, inexpensive and undemanding filters.

To get the sorbent, the researchers made use of low-cost ecologically safe components. The sorbent is based on cotton pulp, which is covered by big nonspherical particles of aluminium oxide (boehmite). To this end, wetted cellulose was mixed with aluminum powder. However, large particles of aluminium do not get water-oxidized in ordinary conditions. To turn entire aluminium powder into oxide, the sorbent developers had to perform activation with alternating sinusoidal power current (50 Hz).

Tests have proved that the sorbent does not lose durability even after a two-day soaking in distilled water and it is capable of functioning in a wide range of ðÍ values, including alkaline medium. The sorbent’s throughput capacity reaches 15000 litre per square meter per hour. The material fully keeps back the test biological object - bacteriophage MS-2, i.e., it exceeds efficiency of Cuno’s Zeta Plus 50S filter, which catches only 99 percent of objects.

Thus, Siberian researchers have created an excellent sorbent of low-cost ecologically safe components by applying simple technologies. In their opinion, the sorbent may be widely applied in medicine, veterinary science, food industry and for purification of water, solutions and outbursts of plants related to utilization of microbiological processes.

Sergey Komarov | alfa
Further information:
http://www.informnauka.ru

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Upcycling 'fast fashion' to reduce waste and pollution
03.04.2017 | American Chemical Society

nachricht Litter is present throughout the world’s oceans: 1,220 species affected
27.03.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

Im Focus: Quantum-physical Model System

Computer-assisted methods aid Heidelberg physicists in reproducing experiment with ultracold atoms

Two researchers at Heidelberg University have developed a model system that enables a better understanding of the processes in a quantum-physical experiment...

Im Focus: Glacier bacteria’s contribution to carbon cycling

Glaciers might seem rather inhospitable environments. However, they are home to a diverse and vibrant microbial community. It’s becoming increasingly clear that they play a bigger role in the carbon cycle than previously thought.

A new study, now published in the journal Nature Geoscience, shows how microbial communities in melting glaciers contribute to the Earth’s carbon cycle, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New quantum liquid crystals may play role in future of computers

21.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A promising target for kidney fibrosis

21.04.2017 | Health and Medicine

Light rays from a supernova bent by the curvature of space-time around a galaxy

21.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>