Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Findings on Camping Impacts, Yellowstone Species, Other Ecological Topics

21.07.2004


Several Montana State University researchers will present their findings at the 89th annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America. The Aug. 1-6 meeting in Portland, Ore. is expected to be the group’s largest meeting ever. Some topics that may interest you are listed below.



Camping impacts

Camping in the mountains leads to major ecological changes, including loss of vegetation and trampled soil. Researchers studied disturbed, undisturbed and restored campsites in three mountain ranges in Montana and Washington. They found that restored campsites were similar to undisturbed sites, but saw the need for continued studies. Brian Eckenrod will give an oral presentation on "High-elevation disturbance effects on soil structure and function: Fertile ground to plow" between 8 and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 3, in meeting room D-139 during the ESA’s annual meeting.


Weevils and knapweed

Root weevils look like a promising biocontrol agent against spotted knapweed. Weevils killed 15 percent of the spotted knapweed growing in plots at the Western Agricultural Research Center near Corvallis. Surviving weeds lost 75 percent of their dry weight after two years of weevil attacks. Researchers say a reduction of that magnitude could slash Montana’s spotted knapweed problem. A poster on "Ecological Benefits from the Biological Control of Spotted Knapweed" will be displayed from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 2, in Exhibit Hall A-1 at the ESA annual meeting.

Plants and roads

An MSU study looked at the relationship between roads and the spread of non-native plants in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Researchers analyzed areas that were seven distances from a national forest road and found that road proximity made a big difference. Once established, the non-native plants spread from roadside patches to less disturbed native communities. Charles Repath will give an oral presentation on "Determining non-native invasive plant propagule as it relates to proximity to roads" between 1:30 and 5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 5, in meeting room B-117 during the ESA’s annual meeting.

Students in forests

MSU students wanting careers in restoration ecology have spent the past three years in national forests. They’ve analyzed the effects of wildfires or abandoned mine reclamation. Students think the course is a lot of work, but it helps them develop the skills they need. A poster on "Training students in applied ecology: A capstone course in land resources and environmental sciences" will be displayed from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 3, in Exhibit Hall A-1 during the ESA annual meeting.

Fire and weeds

Whether weeds follow wildfires is a question many land managers have asked. This group of MSU scientists searched the literature for scientific information on the effect of wildfire on non-native plant species. They also surveyed land managers in the West about the wildfire/non-native plant relationships they see as well as the survey methods they use to monitor the connection. A poster on "Knowledge synthesis and survey of wildfire effects on the occurrence and expansion of non-native plant species distribution in natural areas" will be shown from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 3, in Exhibit Hall A 1 at the ESA annual meeting.

Yellowstone species

If species are well protected within nature reserves, why should their numbers drop? This group suggests that human land use outside the reserves may be part of the reason. This presentation focuses on current and future land use effects within the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, where 11 percent of total lands and 43 percent of unprotected lands have been converted to human use. Andy Hansen will speak on "Land use effects on nature reserves: Greater Yellowstone" between 1:30 and 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 4, in meeting room E 141 at the annual meeting.

River homes

Housing developments are occurring at unprecedented levels in the area surrounding Yellowstone National Park. This land-use study documented a 555 percent growth in the number of homes on portions of the Yellowstone River in Montana. To better understand the ecological impact of those homes, the scientists sampled non-native plant and bird species within residential and adjacent non-residential areas. A poster on "Exurban growth, land use change and non-native species in the upper Yellowstone River valley" will be shown between 5 and 6:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 2, in Exhibit Hall A 1 at the ESA annual meeting.

Plant maps

To manage non-native plants in natural areas, land managers must first know where those unwanted species are. This project surveyed parts of the northern range of Yellowstone National Park during two summers. Elevation, distance from roads, fire history and distance from a trail were the four variables most correlated with the appearance on non-native plants. A poster on "Sampling to understand non-indigenous plant species occurrence and develop probability maps of occurrence" will be shown from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 2, in Exhibit Hall A 1 at the ESA annual meeting.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.montana.edu

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds – Just a Myth?
19.02.2018 | Universität Basel

nachricht Removing fossil fuel subsidies will not reduce CO2 emissions as much as hoped
08.02.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum Technology for Advanced Imaging – QUILT

24.04.2018 | Information Technology

AWI researchers measure a record concentration of microplastic in arctic sea ice

24.04.2018 | Earth Sciences

Complete skin regeneration system of fish unraveled

24.04.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>