Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The great flamingo round-up

07.05.2004


Credit: Wildlife Conservation Society


Credit: Wildlife Conservation Society


Scientists corral, band and release over 300 threatened flamingoes for research

With South America’s Mars-like Altiplano region serving as a surreal back-drop, a group of scientists from the Bronx Zoo-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) recently braved frigid temperatures, high winds, and altitudes of over 11,000 feet to fit bands on 300 threatened James’ flamingoes chicks. Working in Eduardo Avaroa Faunal Reserve in southern Bolivia, the banding effort is part of a multi-nation study on flamingo movements and population dynamics.

Collecting hundreds of birds at a time proved challenging for the scientists. They built a large funnel and a "flamingo corral" with wooden stakes and plastic sheeting, then rounded up a large group of chicks, which gather in flocks of several hundred birds called creches.



"Two groups set out, one on each side of the group of chicks, fanned out, then herded them into the funnel," said Dr. Felicity Arengo, WCS assistant director of Latin America Programs. "There was some chaos and running around while we were herding the birds, but once they were in the pen they calmed down."

After the chicks were rounded up, each was weighed, measured, and fitted with a plastic numbered tag that will allow scientists to identify individuals, before being released. Blood samples were taken from 70 of the largest chicks to record baseline data on their health.

For the past three years, WCS has participated in the banding project, fitting over 500 flamingoes with bands. Both James’ and Andean flamingoes are considered vulnerable with total populations estimated at 64,000 and 34,000 respectively. Since 1997, WCS has worked with local partners in flamingo research and conservation, because habitat is becoming more and more impacted by mining and other human activities.

The windswept Altiplano region that spans Bolivia, Peru, Chile and Argentina is recognized as one of the world’s most inhospitable regions, with extreme dry weather, blistering sunshine and caustic salt lakes dotting the landscape. For flamingoes however, the lakes are rich in microscopic food, while the surrounding wetlands make a perfect breeding ground.

"Most people think of flamingoes as delicate birds that live on tropical beaches and palm trees," said Arengo. "In reality these are extremely tough animals adapted to some of the most rugged conditions on earth."


ADDITIONAL CONTACT: Stephen Sautner-U.S. (718-220-3682;ssautner@wcs.org)
John Delaney-U.S. (718-220-3275; jdelaney@wcs.org)

Stephen Sautner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wcs.org/

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Bioinvasion on the rise
15.02.2017 | Universität Konstanz

nachricht Litter Levels in the Depths of the Arctic are On the Rise
10.02.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>