Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Yellowstone’s long-distance travelers in trouble, study says

20.04.2004


Populations of antelope, elk and deer face growing gauntlet of gas fields and highways



Bottlenecks from increased development are choking off ancient migration routes for wildlife in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and other regions, according to a study by the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) that appears in the current issue of the journal Conservation Biology.

Increased gas development in particular is making it more and more difficult for species like pronghorn antelope to migrate in and out of Yellowstone National Park, a round-trip of 340-miles – the longest of any land-based mammal from Argentina to Toronto. Its current winter migration route consist is a perilous network of narrow mountain passes to 100-yard-wide strips along highways. Carbon dating by archeologists shows that some of these routes have been used for 5,800-7,800 years, according the authors.


"From wildebeest in Africa to antelope in Wyoming, long distance migrations are one of the world’s most stunning yet imperiled biological phenomena," said the study’s lead author Dr. Joel Berger, a WCS biologist based at a field office in Moose, Wyoming. "Here in the U.S., pronghorn and other species are in jeopardy of losing what little migratory ability they have left."

According to the authors, approximately 8,500 energy-extraction sites exist on public lands in southwestern Wyoming, just below the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the 40,000 square-mile region surrounding Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. An additional 15,000 more are planned for the next decade, according to Berger. The effects of this spate of drilling activity on antelope, and other migratory species including elk and mule deer, are largely unknown.

"Unlike the plethora of Alaskan studies designed to understand possible petroleum-related disruption to migratory caribou, no scientific literature exists to assess possible energy-related effects on migration in the GYE," Berger said.

To protect these traditional migrations, the authors of the study suggest that a network of strategically planned protected migration corridors should be established.

Stephen Sautner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wcs.org/

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Safeguarding sustainability through forest certification mapping
27.06.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Dune ecosystem modelling
26.06.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>