Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Yellowstone’s long-distance travelers in trouble, study says

20.04.2004


Populations of antelope, elk and deer face growing gauntlet of gas fields and highways



Bottlenecks from increased development are choking off ancient migration routes for wildlife in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and other regions, according to a study by the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) that appears in the current issue of the journal Conservation Biology.

Increased gas development in particular is making it more and more difficult for species like pronghorn antelope to migrate in and out of Yellowstone National Park, a round-trip of 340-miles – the longest of any land-based mammal from Argentina to Toronto. Its current winter migration route consist is a perilous network of narrow mountain passes to 100-yard-wide strips along highways. Carbon dating by archeologists shows that some of these routes have been used for 5,800-7,800 years, according the authors.


"From wildebeest in Africa to antelope in Wyoming, long distance migrations are one of the world’s most stunning yet imperiled biological phenomena," said the study’s lead author Dr. Joel Berger, a WCS biologist based at a field office in Moose, Wyoming. "Here in the U.S., pronghorn and other species are in jeopardy of losing what little migratory ability they have left."

According to the authors, approximately 8,500 energy-extraction sites exist on public lands in southwestern Wyoming, just below the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, the 40,000 square-mile region surrounding Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. An additional 15,000 more are planned for the next decade, according to Berger. The effects of this spate of drilling activity on antelope, and other migratory species including elk and mule deer, are largely unknown.

"Unlike the plethora of Alaskan studies designed to understand possible petroleum-related disruption to migratory caribou, no scientific literature exists to assess possible energy-related effects on migration in the GYE," Berger said.

To protect these traditional migrations, the authors of the study suggest that a network of strategically planned protected migration corridors should be established.

Stephen Sautner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wcs.org/

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Bioinvasion on the rise
15.02.2017 | Universität Konstanz

nachricht Litter Levels in the Depths of the Arctic are On the Rise
10.02.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>