Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

"Springer" - A Solution To Water Pollution?

05.04.2004


A faster, more efficient way of tracking water pollution and carrying out environmental surveys is being developed.



Work has begun to build “Springer”, an unmanned surface vehicle (USV) that will be able to operate in shallow water.

Funded primarily by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), this innovative vehicle will be built at the University of Plymouth by a multidisciplinary team including engineering and artificial intelligence experts. A wide range of industrial and public sector partners are also involved.


Pollutants that affect inland and coastal waters include organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, which reduce water quality and disturb the natural balance of organisms. They are deposited in waterways via sewage discharges and run-off from agricultural land. Conventional methods of tracking these pollutants to their source, e.g. boat sampling and airborne sensing, are expensive and limited in effectiveness because they can’t be used easily in shallow water. These systems also have to be manned by operators making them more expensive to run than a remote controlled device.

Springer will enable comprehensive surveys to be undertaken more economically than is currently possible. About 3m long, 1.5m wide and with a twin hull, the vehicle will operate in water 1m-60m deep. Designed to work autonomously or under remote manual control, Springer will use a wireless link to communicate with its operator and transmit collected data. The vehicle will be electrically powered, avoiding the possibility of diesel contamination of water or atmosphere.

The project aims to stimulate the growth of UK expertise in USV technology, which is attracting increasing interest worldwide. A key focus will be the development of a novel navigation, guidance and control system that will allow Springer to switch seamlessly between automatic and manual control modes.

Professor Bob Sutton is leading the initiative. He says: “We aim to produce full-scale trials data of interest to environmental and marine agencies, and to industry. The information generated by vehicles like Springer could make a major contribution to the effective cleaning up of our waterways”.

Jane Reck | alfa
Further information:
http://www.epsrc.ac.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Global threat to primates concerns us all
19.01.2017 | Deutsches Primatenzentrum GmbH - Leibniz-Institut für Primatenforschung

nachricht Reducing household waste with less energy
18.01.2017 | FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz-Institut für Informationsinfrastruktur GmbH

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika

23.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>