Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Air pollution death toll needs solutions

02.03.2004


Australia’s air pollution death toll is higher than fatalities from road accidents. So air quality scientists, medical researchers and Government agency representatives from around Australia are meeting in Melbourne this week to tackle the health problems associated with air pollution.



"Mortality due to air pollution in Australia is higher than the road toll," says Dr Tom Beer from CSIRO Atmospheric Research, one of the organisers of the two-day course. "Each year on average, 2400 of the 140,000 Australians deaths are linked to air quality and health issues - much more than the 1700 people who die on our roads. That’s an average of a death every four hours. This number increases if long-term effects of air toxics on cancer are included."

With Australia’s urbanised community becoming increasingly concerned about atmospheric health hazards, representatives from State Government health and environment departments are meeting with atmospheric scientists and medical researchers to discuss how to manage the risk of dangerous and hazardous air pollutants. Dr Beer says it is particularly important to consider the science in light of the national, uniform environmental measures - known as NEPMs.


"CSIRO has decades of experience in air quality research - including gas and particle measurements, computer modelling, and risk assessment," says Dr Beer. "This places us in a unique position to bring together policy-relevant science within a risk framework that integrates scientific and medical concerns."

The course concludes on 2 March. It is part of a National Collaborative Program on the Atmospheric Environment and Health funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing.

The main collaborating institutions are: Australian National University’s National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health; University of Sydney’s School of Public Health; NSW Health; CSIRO Atmospheric Research; Monash University’s Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, and the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre.

More information from:
Dr Tom Beer, CSIRO Atmospheric Research, 03 9239 4546
Email: tom.beer@csiro.au
Dr Bill Physick, CSIRO Atmospheric Research, 03 9239 4636,
Email: bill.physick@csiro.au

Media assistance:
Simon Torok, CSIRO Atmospheric Research, 03 9239 4645, mobile: 0409 844 302
Email: simon.torok@csiro.au

Geraldine Capp | CSIRO
Further information:
http://www.csiro.au/index.asp?type=mediaRelease&id=PrAirPollution2

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Bioinvasion on the rise
15.02.2017 | Universität Konstanz

nachricht Litter Levels in the Depths of the Arctic are On the Rise
10.02.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

21.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate

21.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Use your Voice – and Smart Homes will “LISTEN”

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>