Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

‘Deprived areas suffer most from pollution’ - says expert

21.01.2004


A leading expert from Staffordshire University – who led a study which revealed that people living in the most deprived areas of England are more likely to suffer the effects of pollution – says social injustice has to be tackled through environmental as well as economic policies.



Professor Gordon Walker from Staffordshire University made his comments after the publication of the results from the biggest research project of its kind ever conducted in the UK.

Professor Walker, Director of the Institute for Environment and Sustainability Research at Staffordshire University, led the project in partnership with colleagues from the University of Leeds. The research was commissioned by the Environment Agency.


According to the study people living in England’s most deprived neighbourhoods bear the burden of air pollution, factory emissions and flooding risk.

“Clearly there is an environmental dimension to social injustice. Therefore regeneration cannot just be about creating more jobs or wanting to boost the local economy - it must also have an environmental element,” said Professor Walker. The research found that:

1) In some parts of the country, deprived communities bear the greatest burden of poor air quality.

In England, the most deprived wards experience the highest concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), fine particulates (PM10), sulphur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and benzene. People in deprived wards are exposed to 41 per cent higher concentrations of NO2 , than people living in wards of average deprivation. There are also clusters of wards that have poor aggregate air quality and high deprivation in London, Manchester, Sheffield, Nottingham and Liverpool. However, in Wales, although air quality is generally better, air pollution concentrations are highest in the least deprived wards.

2) Industrial sites where emissions into the environment have to be carefully controlled – known as Integrated Pollution Control (IPC) sites – are located disproportionately in deprived areas in England.

There are five times more sites and authorisations, and seven times more emission sources, in wards containing the most deprived 10 per cent of the population, than in wards with the least deprived 10 per cent. In deprived areas, IPC sites are: more clustered together; on average produce greater numbers of emissions; present a greater pollution hazard; produce more ‘offensive’ pollutants; produce higher emissions of PM10 and carcinogens. In Wales, patterns are very different - there is only some bias towards deprived areas found when looking at multiple sites, while emission levels showed some bias towards affluent areas.

3) Tidal floodplain populations in England are strongly biased towards deprived communities. There are eight times more people from the most deprived 10 per cent of the population living in tidal floodplains, than from the least deprived 10 per cent. However, river floodplain populations are weakly biased towards more affluent communities in England. The relationship between flooding and deprivation is less distinct in Wales.

These findings were produced through the use of digital mapping at Staffordshire University’s state-of-the-art Geographical Information Systems (GIS) lab. Researchers were able to match environmental information from the Environment Agency with socio-economic data.

Professor Walker said it was the biggest study of its kind ever conducted in the UK and it had huge ramifications for policy-makers.

This analysis builds on previous Environment Agency research published in ‘Our Urban Future’ (September 2002).

James Tallentire | alfa
Further information:
http://www.staffs.ac.uk/iesr

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Safeguarding sustainability through forest certification mapping
27.06.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Dune ecosystem modelling
26.06.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>