Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Costing Climate Change

17.10.2002


A Londoner who is greenhouse gas (GHG) aware could save up to £80,000 over a lifetime by making basic lifestyle changes. Significant reductions in GHG emissions are possible at no net cost to the US economy. These are two of the conclusions made by Dr David Reay of the Institute of Ecology and Resource Management at the University of Edinburgh, in his paper `Costing Climate Change`, to be published in the special, triennial Christmas issue of Philosophical Transactions A*, a learned journal published by the Royal Society. This special edition includes research by young scientists on astronomy and earth sciences.



To identify whether individuals can easily make large reductions in GHG emissions in their day-to-day lives and how expensive it is to do, Dr Reay compares the lives of two theoretical Londoners - Mr Carbone, who is GHG-ignorant and Mr Bellamy, who is GHG-aware. Simple lifestyle choices from how they travel to school and work, whether they recycle paper and if they use energy-efficient appliances to where they go on holiday and the sort of food they eat, show startling results.

The GHG-ignorant Mr Carbone, produces 1,250 tonnes of GHGs over a lifetime at a cost of £130,000, while GHG-aware Mr Bellamy, produces a significantly lower 370 tonnes of GHGs at a cost of £49,000. "With one million Mr Bellamys we could achieve an annual reduction in UK GHG emissions of more than five million tonnes and a cash saving of £1 billion," says Dr Reay.


Although it is the world`s biggest GHG polluter, the US Government justified its abandonment of a commitment to the Kyoto Protocol, with claims that it is not in the country`s `economic best interests`. However, Dr Reay concludes that `cuts in GHG emissions cannot be justifiably dismissed as posing too large an economic burden and contrary to the US government`s assertion, cuts are both viable and vital`.

Dr Reay has examined a number of GHG-abatement strategies that are possible at low or no cost. "Renewable energy technologies, solid-waste treatment, afforestation and land management can contribute to significant reductions. Catastrophic climate changes could ensue if we do not reduce GHG emissions and my analyses indicate that the costs incurred in rectifying damage to human health, material goods, agriculture and the environment, far outweigh the costs of implementing many GHG-reducing initiatives," says Dr Reay.

For futher information, pdf, media password to access files direct online, please contact: Elaine Calvert on 0776 461 4113/010 7241 6227 / email: elaine.calvert@lineone.net

Elaine Calvert | alfa

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht How fires are changing the tundra’s face
12.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

nachricht Using drones to estimate crop damage by wild boars
12.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cellular Self-Digestion Process Triggers Autoimmune Disease

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>