Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Microwaving Waste Goodbye

18.06.2008
Malaysia produce 70 million tons of organic wastes annually. Most of these are either incinerated or dumped in landfill and both of which have serious impact on the environment. A research is conducted at Universiti Malaysia Sarawak to reutilise the wastes and explore their potential as energy sources.

In Malaysia, approximately 70 million tones of organic wastes are generated annually as municipal solid wastes, agricultural residues, animal wastes, sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plant and wood chips.

Most of these wastes are either incinerated or dumped in landfill. The latter requires precious open lands, while the former contributes to serious atmospheric pollution. Both of which have serious impact on the environment. The country, therefore, needs to adopt a more practical, economic and acceptable approach in managing and disposing the organic wastes.

The thing about organic wastes is that they harbour abundance volatile matter which can be converted to fuel through suitable treatment, such as pyrolysis. This possible method is receiving increasing attention as an economic and environmentally acceptable route to waste disposal due to its ability to produce fuel gases and oil.

The latest development in the pyrolysis technology is the application of heat by using microwave energy. Microwave treatment might serve as an alternative method for drying, pyrolysing and gasifying the organic wastes in one single step. The research in this method, however, has not been extensive. Published information on microwave pyrolysis design and process condition is also lacking.

A research group at the Department of Chemistry, University Malaysia Sarawak, has designed a laboratory scale microwave pyrolysis system through modification of laboratory microwave oven. The aim is to conduct chemical characterisation of the waste samples and their microwave pyrolysis products, and to optimise the microwave pyrolysis processes for optimum biofuel yield which is environmentally acceptable. The main focus is to develop an efficient, simple and low-temperature based process for converting organic wastes into useful renewable energy sources.

Preliminary studies on low-temperature microwave pyrolysis of sewage sludge suggest a fuel material potential, comparable to the lower grade coal.It is hoped that data gathered in this study will provide useful information on the microwave pyrolysis of organic wastes and the potential use of the process as an alternative for the reutilisation of wastes, which at the same time produce renewable energy sources for industries in Malaysia.

ABOUT UNIVERSITI MALAYSIA SARAWAK (UNIMAS)

UNIMAS was established in 1992. The University's mission is to generate, disseminate and apply knowledge strategically and innovatively to enhance the quality of the nation’s culture and prosperity of its people. The knowledge creation initiatives at UNIMAS are premised partly upon the wealth of natural resources and diverse socio-cultural make up of the State of Sarawak. UNIMAS commitment to research has already been recognized by the stakeholders and partners in industry through provision of endowments for the establishment of eight research chairs; these include the Tun Zaidi Chair for Medicinal Chemistry, the Tun Openg Chair for Sago Technology, the Shell Chair for Environmental Studies, and the Sapura Chair for ICT.

Resni Mona | ResearchSEA
Further information:
http://www.unimas.my
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Scientists on the road to discovering impact of urban road dust
18.01.2018 | University of Alberta

nachricht Gran Chaco: Biodiversity at High Risk
17.01.2018 | Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Optical Nanoscope Allows Imaging of Quantum Dots

Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. In particular, the new method allows the imaging of quantum dots in a semiconductor chip. Together with colleagues from the University of Bochum, scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute reported the findings in the journal Nature Photonics.

Microscopes allow us to see structures that are otherwise invisible to the human eye. However, conventional optical microscopes cannot be used to image...

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rutgers scientists discover 'Legos of life'

23.01.2018 | Life Sciences

Seabed mining could destroy ecosystems

23.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

Transportable laser

23.01.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>