Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Ten simultaneous cruises in the Mediterranean and Black Sea begin

Following the first multinational cruise to the Black Sea in October 2007, the SESAME project is embarking upon a set of simultaneous cruises, the Ünlüata cruises, for data collection purposes in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

A unique scientific and educational experience awaits everyone involved, as for the first time, the scientific community will join efforts to sample the two ecosystems at the same time. The results will produce a snapshot of the two seas, and they will feed the SESAME database in order to eventually produce scenarios that will predict the future changes that may affect these ecosystems in the next 50 years.

Ten different cruises have been planned for the months of March and April, arising from the different partners involved in the SESAME project. The vessels will simultaneously sample the Mediterranean and the Black Sea, in order to collect data for the SESAME database. This is the first time that simultaneous research is taking place, in order to understand physical, chemical and biological processes on a large scale in the Southern European Seas (SES).

The participating countries include Italy, Spain, Tunisia, Israel, Greece, Turkey, Romania, Bulgaria and Russia. The main objective of the Ünlüata cruises is to sample the two environments at the same time, and thus prepare high quality datasets of new hydrographical, chemical and biological data collected during the quasi-synoptic cruises. Some of the parameters to be measured include temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nutrients and chlorophyll-a. Additionally, samples for inorganic and organic dissolved carbon measurements, total alkalinity, as well as bacterial, phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass and production will also be taken.

These will be incorporated in the SESAME database and will be used for the implementation, tuning and evaluation of the ecological models.

This is the first time that the two seas will be sampled simultaneously, which will eventually yield a snapshot of the state of the Southern European Seas ecosystems. All sampling activities fall under the project’s work frame, and this newly collected data will be compared to historical data sets from 50 years ago. The results will, in turn, feed the models which will produce scenarios to predict possible changes in these ecosystems in the next 50 years to come, which underlines the project’s main objective.

Scientists, journalists, the general public, and schools in particular are invited to ‘follow’ the cruises online, as a special map with all stations, a cruise diary, data from CTD casts, and photos from aboard the research vessels will be uploaded daily on the website. A special area to host the cruises online has been created, where each vessel is shown with clear location coordinates, and also includes photos, as well as the daily diary both in the respective language and in English, thus making it accessible to a wide audience. Additionally, some schools will be able to connect to the researchers via a telephone connection, thus further strengthening the education initiatives and public outreach that underpin the project.

These cruises will not only collect crucial data for these ecosystems, but they add a societal and educational perspective to science, which will encourage the involvement of school children, and the society at large, in research activities, with the hope of raising awareness about the sea and climate change in general.

Martha Papathanassiou | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Invasive Insects Cost the World Billions Per Year
04.10.2016 | University of Adelaide

nachricht Malaysia's unique freshwater mussels in danger
27.09.2016 | The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

VDI presents International Bionic Award of the Schauenburg Foundation

26.10.2016 | Awards Funding

3-D-printed magnets

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Advanced analysis of brain structure shape may track progression to Alzheimer's disease

26.10.2016 | Health and Medicine

More VideoLinks >>>