Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

World Climate Conference-3 To Seek More Support For Improving Climate Predictions

07.02.2008
Next year’s landmark WMO World Climate Conference 3 (WCC-3) will urge the international scientific community, including governments, to do more to improve seasonal climate predictions to enable the planet to adapt to the impacts of climate variability and change, saving lives and protecting economies in the process.

This was the call from more than 20 organizations, including many United Nations agencies, who today ended a three-day meeting in Geneva held to prepare for next year’s event, hosted by Switzerland, titled: “Climate prediction for decision-making: focusing on seasonal to inter-annual time-scales taking into account multi-decadal prediction.”

Previous World Climate Conferences have been decisive events. The first, held in 1979, led to the 1988 establishment of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, jointly established by WMO and the United Nations Environment Programme. The second, in 1990, strengthened global efforts that resulted in the creation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in 1992.

Key points identified during this week’s first meeting of the WCC-3 International Organizing Committee included the urgent need to enhance global environmental observations and to preserve climatic records. Open access to climate data and information is also needed, as well as improvements of the accuracy, resolution and scope of climate analyses and predictions.

Comprehensive climate information can provide largely untapped opportunities to manage climate risks including, extreme weather events, heat waves, flooding, sustained droughts, and more frequent cyclones. It will also help communities adapt to the adverse affects of climate variability and change - such as sea level rise, water and food shortages, desertification and risks to human health.

“There has been too little global investment in the science that underpins seasonal climate prediction, and this is what the World Climate Conference wants to remedy,” WMO Secretary-General Michel Jarraud said. “The World Climate Conference is looking at the future, at what type of science is needed over the next 10 years to provide the type of seasonal predictions that can save people’s lives and livelihoods. And it will seek high-level support, particularly from governments, to make this happen”

“The world needs to strengthen existing mechanisms that predict climatic events and then ensure that this information is made available to all, especially to the benefit of people in least developed countries. Improving the science of seasonal prediction will help everyone.”

Several WMO-backed climate prediction centres currently produce global temperature and precipitation predictions through use of powerful computer models. But strengthening and coordinating these capabilities can optimize and extend these global responses to climate variability and extremes, and meet the needs of decision-makers for better climate predictions in major socio-economic sectors.

WCC-3 International Organizing Committee Chair, Don MacIver from Canada said: “The world needs to strengthen its ability to assess and predict the likelihood of severe events arising from climate variability and change, and then ensure that this information is made available to all, especially for the benefit of least developed countries. Improving climate information and prediction will help everyone.”

Paul Garwood | alfa
Further information:
http://www.wmo.int

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Preservation of floodplains is flood protection
27.09.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Introduction of a novel system for in vitro analyses of zebrafish oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Did you know how many parts of your car require infrared heat?

23.10.2017 | Automotive Engineering

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>