Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Potential antifouling substance can cause paler fish

10.05.2010
The sedative medetomidine has proved effective at inhibiting fouling and is now being trialled by the EU as an ingredient for the antifouling paints of the future.

Research at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, has shown that high concentrations of this substance can have an impact on the marine environment.

Since TBT was banned worldwide in 2008, the search for environmentally friendly antifouling paints has reached fever pitch. One of the substances on trial is medetomidine, a sedative used in veterinary medicine that has also been shown to prevent barnacle larvae from attaching themselves to vessels.

Being trialled
Medetomidine is currently being trialled under the EU's Biocidal Products Directive as an active agent in antifouling paint. In her thesis, researcher Anna Lennquist from the Department of Zoology at the University of Gothenburg has examined the effects of low concentrations of medetomidine on fish.
Makes fish paler
The thesis covers studies where rainbow trout, Atlantic cod, turbot, three-spined stickleback and Atlantic salmon were treated with medetomidine for periods of 1-54 days. The research shows that the most obvious effect is that medetomidine makes fish paler as it affects the skin cells that contain dark pigment.
Important for camouflage
"The pigment cells don't seem to be damaged, even during long-term treatment with medetomidine, but their sensitivity is affected slightly," says Lennquist. "While the paleness itself isn't harmful, functioning pigmentation is very important for a fish's camouflage, communication and UV protection."
Effects the liver
Another effect noted in several of the studies is that a detoxifying enzyme in the fish's liver is affected. "In studies of isolated liver fractions, we have been able to establish that the effect of the enzyme is undermined by medetomidine," says Lennquist. "This could mean that a fish's ability to break down environmental toxins is impaired by the substance."
Less active
Other effects noted after treatment with medetomidine are that the fish are slightly less active and have less of an appetite. Blood sugar content and liver size are also thought to be affected.
Must be monitored
"The intention of the thesis was to identify some of the ways that fish could be affected if we do use medetomidine in antifouling paint. We can state that the leakage of medetomidine should be carefully monitored so that harmful concentrations do not find their way into the marine environment. At the same time, the substance has not proved to have any effect in other important areas, such as growth, oxidative stress, cell toxicity and gene expression."
The thesis Studies of fish responses to the antifoulant medetomidine
was successfully defended on 23 April. Download the thesis at:
http://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/22081
Contact:
Anna Lennquist, Department of Zoology, University of Gothenburg
+46 70 572 4750
+46 31 786 3683
anna.lennquist@zool.gu.se

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/22081
http://www.gu.se

Further reports about: Atlantic Zoology environmental toxin marine environment skin cell

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Litter is present throughout the world’s oceans: 1,220 species affected
27.03.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

nachricht International network connects experimental research in European waters
21.03.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei (IGB)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Transport of molecular motors into cilia

28.03.2017 | Life Sciences

A novel hybrid UAV that may change the way people operate drones

28.03.2017 | Information Technology

NASA spacecraft investigate clues in radiation belts

28.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>