Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Oil and gas development homogenizing core-forest bird communities

22.05.2014

Conventional oil and gas development in northern Pennsylvania altered bird communities, and the current massive build-out of shale-gas infrastructure may accelerate these changes, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

The commonwealth's Northern Tier -- one of the largest blocks of Eastern deciduous forest in the entire Appalachian region -- is an important breeding area for neotropical migrant songbirds. These diminutive, insect-eating creatures, which breed in Pennsylvania and winter in Central and South America, contribute greatly to the health of forests.

But they are being negatively affected in areas where there are high densities of shallow oil and gas wells, says Margaret Brittingham, professor of wildlife resources, who conducted a study of bird communities in the Allegheny National Forest. The national forest, on the extensively forested Allegheny Plateau in northwestern Pennsylvania, has more than 14,000 active oil and gas wells. Although the footprint of a shallow well is much smaller than the immense Marcellus Shale well pads now being built across the region, clusters of shallow wells, service roads, pads and pipelines create networks of disturbance that fragment forests, changing songbird communities, Brittingham explained.

"The cumulative effect of many small-scale disturbances within the forest is resulting in the homogenization of bird communities, with species that inhabit the interior forest, such as black-throated blue warblers, ovenbirds and Blackburnian warblers being pushed out, and species that prefer living in edge habitat and near people and development, such as robins, blue jays and mourning doves, moving in," she said.

... more about:
»diversity »ecological »forests »habitat »pipelines »species

"Biotic homogenization is a subtle process by which generalists replace specialists, with common and widespread species tending to become more abundant and habitat specialists declining. Our results revealed changes in avian guilds resulting from oil and gas development and suggest that a loss of community uniqueness is a consequence."

The study, done in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Northern Forest Research Station, took place over three years. Lead researcher Emily Thomas, at the time a graduate student advised by Brittingham, surveyed birds in 50-acre blocks selected for their varied amount of oil and gas development.

Thomas completed her master's degree in wildlife and fisheries science and is currently an instructor in the wildlife technology program at Penn State DuBois.

In a recently published issue of the Journal of Wildlife Management, the researchers documented the presence or absence of different songbird species in a range of landscapes, including undisturbed forest, low-density oil and gas development, and high-density development. They catalogued the abundance and diversity of songbirds in the study areas, which spanned two types of forest -- northern hardwood and oak.

"We wanted to find out what the well pads, roads, pipelines and other openings created by oil and gas development are doing to bird populations," said Brittingham. "We compared and contrasted the abundance and diversity of birds near well sites to bird communities in reference sites far away from disturbances in the big woods, and what we found was compelling." Forest interior species declined in proximity to the wells and at a rate that was roughly proportional to the intensity of gas development. Songbird species that prefer early successional habitat increased in abundance on the edge of gas development.

In addition, Brittingham noted, the generalist bird species that do better around people and tend to be common wherever there are people or development were more abundant near oil and gas development than within undisturbed forest -- potentially displacing the forest specialists.

The expansive development of Marcellus Shale gas, which began within the core forests of northcentral Pennsylvania around 2007, is increasing exponentially. Deep, horizontal shale gas wells differ substantially from shallow, conventional oil and gas wells in many ways.

Shale-gas well pads are immense but occur at a much lower density. Drillers install pad substrate of stone to support heavy equipment, and the drillers use a much greater quantity of water for hydrofracturing. That technology demands greatly increased levels of truck traffic on wider, more highly engineered roads. Brittingham and her students are currently studying the effects of shale-gas development on birds to determine how it affects avian communities.

"Birds are easy to study and survey to gauge the impacts of gas development because they are abundant, respond quickly to habitat change and are early indicators of problems," she said. "The bottom line is we are going to have resource extraction in this state, but the forests on top of it are providing clean water, clean air, climate regulation and a host of other ecological values.

"We need to maintain them as healthy, functioning ecosystems while extracting the gas. We hope our research will help to determine where thresholds of change occur and to identify areas where gas development should be avoided or minimal at best to protect these valuable ecological services that are provided free-of-charge to all of us."

###

This USDA Bureau of Forestry funded this work.

A'ndrea Elyse Messer | Eurek Alert!
Further information:
http://www.psu.edu

Further reports about: diversity ecological forests habitat pipelines species

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Bioinvasion on the rise
15.02.2017 | Universität Konstanz

nachricht Litter Levels in the Depths of the Arctic are On the Rise
10.02.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>